Watch: How the 5 Major Religions Spread Across the World

The 5 largest religions today are Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam–but it wasn’t always that way. In this video, Alex Kuzoian at Business Insider walks us through 5000 years of history, showing how the world’s religions initially took root in small geographic areas in southern Asia and the Middle East. They didn’t remain localized for long.

Think Sharks are Scary? They Should Feel The Same Way About Us.

In honor of Shark Awareness Day we bring you this graphic, presented in a simple way, but with a very powerful point.

Have a little scroll

Want to Climb Everest? This Cool Guide Walks You Through the Trip to the Summit

Big projects take big planning, and climbing Mount Everest isn’t any different. The challenge for an undertaking like this is keeping all the details in order, and making sure you’re prepared – the cost of failure is very high. For their Everest Guide, Winfield Outdoors created a smart flow chart we really like. They could have just given us a boring directory of articles, but instead they visually guide us through the many important steps needed to reach this lofty goal.

A True Picture of Population Density

Look up a city’s urban density on Wikipedia, and you know you’re only getting a small slice of the story. There’s no way exactly 27,857.9 people live in every square mile of New York City – some areas are far more packed, some are relatively empty (at least when it comes to living space). Perhaps the best way to get a true picture of where people live is to check out the residential density per square kilometer. That’s what these 3D maps from LSECities visualize, giving us a unique look at 9 world cities and their distribution of people. Each map here looks at a 100 x 100 kilometer square, and quickly reveals how factors like topography and the location of public transport have influenced the growth of these places.

30 Critically Endangered Species, 1 Beautiful Geometric Interactive

No matter how you put it together, we are in the midst of a huge extinction event. Almost as fast as we can categorize them, species are disappearing around the world… but there is some hope. Species In Pieces is a striking interactive visualization by Bryan James which assembles 30 critically endangered species out of CSS polygons, then shares the hopeful data on how groups are working to bring them back from the brink.

What Percentage of Rich and Poor Families Go to College? This Interactive Asks You to Draw the Chart

The New York Time’s has a very unique game to play over at The Upshot. They’re question: “how likely is it that children who grow up in very poor families go to college?” Not content to leave us with a simple percentage to fill in, they’ve created an interactive ‘draw your guess’ chart to see how close to reality people can get.

The chart compares ‘parents’ income percentile’ to the ‘percent of children who attend college.’ The results are probably not what you expect… but highly revealing of current trends.

This Jaw-Dropping Video Will Make the Earth Seem VERY Small

If you ever watched Cosmos as a kid (or just on Youtube) you know Carl Sagan loved to drop his catch phrase ‘billions and billions’. But Sagan didn’t just talk about how big everything was in the universe, some numbers are just too large to comprehend. This video explains the universe a lot like Sagan would, by showing it to us in a way we can’t possibly forget.

Visualizing the Movements of Chess Pieces Using Millions of Games

Every chess piece has a signature footprint after millions of moves. Using the 2.2 million chess games stored at Million Base, Steve Tung has visualized the movements of individual chess pieces across the board. Each of his images reveal that unique footprint and some of the most popular strategies used during a normal game.

These Two Visualizations Will Truly Make You Appreciate Musical Skill

Listening to a concert is one thing, seeing it is another, and this is something different all together. These two videos are the work of Stephen Malinowski, and his Music Animation Machine, or MAM. Using it, he’s distilled complex classical music pieces into colorful visualizations that help us to distinguish between the many instruments, and complex timings involved in performing them. It’s one more way to appreciate these masterworks.

How Much Did the Department of the Defense Pay the NFL to Salute the Troops?

New government documents obtained by NJ.com reveal what some taxpayers may consider disturbing spending by the Department of Defense. A total of $5.4 million in taxpayer money was paid to the NFL between 2011 and 2014 for various salutes to the troops and other advertising during games. As viewers believed these salutes to be genuine acknowledgments for time served—not paid advertising as a recruiting tool—many are upset that taxpayer money was used to mislead viewers. The Department of Defense paid 14 NFL teams $5.4 million to salute the troops. So, how much did they pay?