Speedy Graphito: A French Street and Pop Art Legend

A pioneer of the street art movement in France, Speedy Graphito brought the avant-garde to the streets and inspired a generation of future artists. Expressed in many mediums, his work is bold, vibrant and controversial – and while a good amount of his creativity is paint-based, he also works with sculpture, installations, video and photography.

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The World Is A Yoga Mat: Urban Yoga in New York, Paris, Madrid and Ljubljana

Yogi, architect and artist Anja Humljan encourages us to re-observe our busy cities, seeing them as world to deeply interact with, and even a place to de-stress. For her collaborative project and upcoming book, The Urban Yoga, she traveled to world cities, exploring their concrete and steel environments and how they interact with the human body.

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New Cityscape Sculptures “Sketched with a Bandsaw” from Artist James McNabb

When we last covered artist James McNabb, he was launching his series of bandsaw cut cities on Kickstarter, giving city blocks as rewards for support. He’s come a long way since then, recently opening a solo show called Metros at Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami. His imaginative work continues to evolve and grow, just like the cities around us. His work is a commentary on the “transformations of cities and urban landscapes, their beauty, uniqueness, and overdevelopment.” In a way, this is the journey of a woodworker from the quiet forest into the urban jungle.

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Shh, Don’t Wake These Sleepy Kids!

Nap time has the unfortunate tendency of disappearing once you reach adulthood. French photographer Alice Lemarin captures the childhood privilege of dozing whenever and wherever you want in her Sleeping series.

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Silhouettes Play on the Streets of Padua

The streets of Padua Italy are filled with playful silhouettes by local street artist Kenny Random. Kenny, whose real name is Andrea Coppo has been practicing the art form since the eighties, and over the years his style has ranged from anthropomorphic figures, stenciled silhouettes and a myriad of cartoon characters which interact with each other.

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Wild Animal Murals: Too Large to Be Ignored

As the global population of humans increases each day, animals are pushed to adapt and creatively survive in our presence. Belgian artist ROA infuses this issue into the street art he paints around the world. In countries like Australia, Portugal, Canada and the United Kingdom, his large-scale murals highlight the current reality in the relationship between wild animals and humans.

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These Murals in Tehran Merge with the Sky

The architecture in the city of Tehran is a mixed bag. One building can have a nice modern facade, while the surrounding buildings are just simple and gray. This discrepancy in building practices led to the government allotting a budget committed to making public art a greater priority. For the past eight years, local Iranian artists have been commissioned to do large murals on the blank buildings to “color” up the city they all love.

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In the Belly of the Whale: Rest Hall at U of Seoul Made of Wooden Ribs

Tucked under the stark grey exterior of a building at the University of Seoul is a warm and organic place to rest. Called Rest Hall and nicknamed Hole, the inviting structure resembles the belly of a whale, complete with row upon row of wooden ribs. Walking into the central entrance, the cave-like space encircles you with the warmth of natural timber rings, with chambers opening to the left and right.

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Just Bolt it On: Smart, Powered Bicycle Wheels are on the Way

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NPR recently wrote about how, in almost every european country, bikes are outselling new cars – and that’s exciting news for anyone who wants to see bikes become a more dominant means of transportation. But, unless you’re a spandex sporting bike nut, most people don’t want to arrive at work dripping in sweat. Enter two exciting new, and funded, projects for powered bicycle wheels that are simply smart: the Copenhagen Wheel and FlyKly. How do you get extra power? Simply pedal like any normal bike.

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German Duo Create Street Art That Can Only Be Viewed From a Certain Angle

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On the streets of Mannheim, Germany live an artistic duo who are sprucing up their city in common places. They go by the name Zebrating, and for a while now they have been creating realistic images of human faces on railings, bringing color and life to the grey areas. The unique appeal to their work is that it can only be viewed from a certain angle. If one were to view the railings directly, one would only see dull metallic, yet when looked at a 45 degree angle, the colors and beautiful faces appear.

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