Skaters Build a Railroad Riding Half-Pipe & Rowboat Ramp in the Latest Film From Zenga Bros.

You might recall the Zenga Bros. from their energy charged, nostalgia inducing film Ski Boys (and if you haven’t seen it yet, I’m envious). Now they’re back with a new short that’s equally enthralling. They worked with a load of skaters to create imaginatively artistic mobile skate ramps like you’ve never seen before. One is a railroad-traveling half-pipe with a conductors cabin on either end. Just roll it down the rails for a different view.

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Exclusive Interview with Oxygen Channels “Street Art Throwdown” Artist CAMER1

One of today’s best known street artists in the San Francisco Bay Area is Camer1. After 20 years of bringing his art to the city, he was chosen along with 9 other street artists to compete in a new Oxygen Channel show called “Street Art Throwdown“. Hosted by famous street artist Justin BUA and Lauren Wagner, the TV series will feature a range of challenges for the artists. In the end, a winner will walk away with $100,000 and some added respect.

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Speedy Graphito: A French Street and Pop Art Legend

A pioneer of the street art movement in France, Speedy Graphito brought the avant-garde to the streets and inspired a generation of future artists. Expressed in many mediums, his work is bold, vibrant and controversial – and while a good amount of his creativity is paint-based, he also works with sculpture, installations, video and photography.

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Window Illusions on the Streets of Istanbul

Spanish street artist Pejac recently took a trip to Istanbul, using his time there to give the city a few new windows (in his own illusory street art style of course). His work fits seamlessly into the local architecture and would probably be missed if they weren’t so interesting and different. While in the ancient city, he created a piece that looks like a keyhole, a gothic arched window, and a tiny window with massive wooden shutters.

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Banksy’s “Alarming” New Work in Bristol

Despite the recent hoax claiming that he’d been arrested and identified, legendary street artist Banksy continues to paint up the city. In fact, in the midst of the uproar over whether he’d been identified, a new work appeared on his website.

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OsGemeos Transform Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants

Renowned Brazilian street artist twins, OsGemeos have lent their signature ‘Giants’ to a series of six huge silos for the Vancouver Biennale. Located on Granville Island, the 70-foot tall towers perfectly match the duo’s work, even including small legs at the bottom.

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Window Silhouettes Play with the World Outside

Spanish street artist Pejac is no stranger to the art of the silhouette. Even when doing highly detailed paint work his pieces often incorporate some form of clever black and white figure or shape. One way he’s experimented with silhouettes is on the windows of his apartments, most recently creating a playful tribute to French high-wire artist Philippe Petit. Here, in an imaginative use of forced-perspective, the tightrope walker balances on a jet’s vapor trail.

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Lace Up the Place! Street Art and Yarn Bombing by Nespoon

With a touch of lace in all her work, Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon has been applying her signature patterns to everything from stenciled street art, to site-specific ceramics and web-like crochet installations (spiders take note). Her work has a friendly and welcoming aesthetic which beatifies and enhances the often decrepit environment they occupy. Working with that in mind, she calls her art “public jewelry.”

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Street Art On The Railroad Tracks of Portugal

Throughout the history of street art, train cars and the tunnels they pass through have served as a canvas for street artists to make their mark. In Portugal, artist Artur Bordalo has used a slightly different canvas to put his work on: the tracks themselves. Is this now what we call Rail Art? It could be.

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Silhouettes Play on the Streets of Padua

The streets of Padua Italy are filled with playful silhouettes by local street artist Kenny Random. Kenny, whose real name is Andrea Coppo has been practicing the art form since the eighties, and over the years his style has ranged from anthropomorphic figures, stenciled silhouettes and a myriad of cartoon characters which interact with each other.

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