Surprising New Paste Ups Interact with the Street

Street artist/street modifier OakOak (previously) has been hard at work over the past year, transforming the streets into playgrounds for characters large and small. The French artist is a specialist in street interventions, using derelict objects like bent pipes, cracked pavement and nightly shadows as inspiration for his surprising brand of art.

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Charles Leval Makes Art That Interacts With the Streets of Paris

French street artist Charles Leval (aka Levalet) is pasting up Paris with highly original artwork that interacts with the street itself. With his talented eye, a metal grate turns into an umbrella, a advertising box becomes an x-ray machine, and a sculptural Minotaur’s head grows a body (doing a maze of course).

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Rain Activated Street Art Brings Smiles to The People of Seattle

You can be mad that it’s raining or you can dance in the rain! The people of Seattle have grown accustomed to a lot of rain, but rather than letting it bring them down, they have a new reason to embrace the rain. Rainworks are street art stencils made by Peregrine Church that only show up when it rains. They feature positive messages and even a rainy day hopscotch game. With the sole purpose of making people smile on rainy days, Church is accomplishing his mission and creating new works often.

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Skaters Build a Railroad Riding Half-Pipe & Rowboat Ramp in the Latest Film From Zenga Bros.

You might recall the Zenga Bros. from their energy charged, nostalgia inducing film Ski Boys (and if you haven’t seen it yet, I’m envious). Now they’re back with a new short that’s equally enthralling. They worked with a load of skaters to create imaginatively artistic mobile skate ramps like you’ve never seen before. One is a railroad-traveling half-pipe with a conductors cabin on either end. Just roll it down the rails for a different view.

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Exclusive Interview with Oxygen Channels “Street Art Throwdown” Artist CAMER1

One of today’s best known street artists in the San Francisco Bay Area is Camer1. After 20 years of bringing his art to the city, he was chosen along with 9 other street artists to compete in a new Oxygen Channel show called “Street Art Throwdown“. Hosted by famous street artist Justin BUA and Lauren Wagner, the TV series will feature a range of challenges for the artists. In the end, a winner will walk away with $100,000 and some added respect.

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Speedy Graphito: A French Street and Pop Art Legend

A pioneer of the street art movement in France, Speedy Graphito brought the avant-garde to the streets and inspired a generation of future artists. Expressed in many mediums, his work is bold, vibrant and controversial – and while a good amount of his creativity is paint-based, he also works with sculpture, installations, video and photography.

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Window Illusions on the Streets of Istanbul

Spanish street artist Pejac recently took a trip to Istanbul, using his time there to give the city a few new windows (in his own illusory street art style of course). His work fits seamlessly into the local architecture and would probably be missed if they weren’t so interesting and different. While in the ancient city, he created a piece that looks like a keyhole, a gothic arched window, and a tiny window with massive wooden shutters.

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Banksy’s “Alarming” New Work in Bristol

Despite the recent hoax claiming that he’d been arrested and identified, legendary street artist Banksy continues to paint up the city. In fact, in the midst of the uproar over whether he’d been identified, a new work appeared on his website.

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OsGemeos Transform Silos in Vancouver into Towering Giants

Renowned Brazilian street artist twins, OsGemeos have lent their signature ‘Giants’ to a series of six huge silos for the Vancouver Biennale. Located on Granville Island, the 70-foot tall towers perfectly match the duo’s work, even including small legs at the bottom.

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Window Silhouettes Play with the World Outside

Spanish street artist Pejac is no stranger to the art of the silhouette. Even when doing highly detailed paint work his pieces often incorporate some form of clever black and white figure or shape. One way he’s experimented with silhouettes is on the windows of his apartments, most recently creating a playful tribute to French high-wire artist Philippe Petit. Here, in an imaginative use of forced-perspective, the tightrope walker balances on a jet’s vapor trail.

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