To Infinity And Beyond: Cosmic Loop Follows An Astronaut Through The Fractals of Space

From the creative minds of The Imaginary Foundation, a think tank in Switzerland, comes this fractal loop that could keep you busy all day long! Follow an astronaut through the cosmos on this digitally detailed loop that keeps going and revealing more colorful pieces each time you watch. The images here are taken from the loop, but to get the full effect, you must see for yourself on Cosmic-Symbolism.com.

This One Picture Will Make You Realize How Big The Universe Actually Is

We’ve all heard the universe is a very big place, but this image from Alex Grossman really drives that concept home.

The question: How far has humanity’s influence reached?

The very first thing created by humanity that left our tiny planet wasn’t a satellite or space ship, it was the broadcasts from a world obsession with radio. This image shows how far radio broadcasts will have reached in our galaxy, the Milky Way, by the time that technology is 200 years old. Considering we only started broadcasting in 1880, this map actually represents our reach in 2080.

“An Astronaut’s Guide To Optimism”: Chris Hadfield’s Inspiring Video for the New Year

You’ve heard of Colonel Chris Hadfield before. He’s the Canadian astronaut who captured the hearts and minds of the world, commanding the International Space Station as he beamed back pictures of our beautiful planet, jammed live with the Bare Naked Ladies, and performed David Bowie’s Space Oddity, from space.

Wild View From Inside A Water Bubble In The Microgravity of Outer Space

If you spent your childhood dreaming you would grow up to be an astronaut and didn’t, this video will make you want to take out a loan to get one of those 20 newly available reservations on the first Virgin Galactic space flight. This past summer 2014, on the International Space Station during Expedition 40, astronauts recorded their exploration of water surface tension in microgravity. Pushing a Go-Pro Camera into a softball sized ball of floating water, they got a view from inside the bubble as well. They also recorded the wild phenomenon with a 3-D camera, another version you can view here if you have stereoscopic red/blue 3-D glasses.

Beam Me Up Soapy! Duncan Shotton’s UFO Abduction Soap Dispenser Is Out Of This World

Traditional soap dispensers are not that much fun, but British designer Duncan Shotton’s UFO soap pump does for hand washing what the rubber duck has done for bath time. The perfect dollop of soap comes out of a UFO beaming down to abduct a cow or human. The tractor beam comes in yellow or blue and looks best with clear soap inside. These products will be launching at Designboom Mart in Tokyo from October 25th- November 3rd, 2014. You can pre-order now, but orders will not be shipped until after the launch event.

Redditor Captures A Rare Fireball Meteor on Video

Ben Lewis recently enlisted the help of astronomy loving Redditors to identify a mysterious looking cloud he captured while filming the night sky. What he found out was surprising. He’d managed to accidentally capture a rare sky event – a giant bolide meteor, or fireball, as it burned up in the earth’s atmosphere. Even more rare, was that he framed it beautifully in the tree foliage above. The video below does a good job showing the red cloudy streak the meteor left in its wake.

33 Soviet Propaganda Posters of the Space Age

The Soviet propaganda machine was running strong in the early to mid 20th century, and when it came to their highly successful space program, the artists creating the omnipresent posters had truly hit gold.

On 4 October 1957, the country launched humanities first earth satellite, Sputnik, and stunned people the world over as they watched it fly overhead in the night sky (this is the October referred to in many of the posters below). Their program launched the first animals into space, and in 1961 sent Yuri Gagarin on his historic single orbit as the very first human (“Восто́к” in Russian can be seen in many of these posters honoring his Vostok spacecraft). They launched the first woman into space in 1963, beating America by almost exactly 20 years. And those are just a few of their ‘firsts.’

Origami Could Be A Solution To One Of Space Exploration’s Greatest Problems

When it comes to exploring the vast unknown that is space, one of the biggest problems is, ironically, a lack of space. But now a team of research engineers at Brigham Young University, led by professor Larry Howell, are thinking outside the box to figure out how to get more inside the box and have begun applying origami principles to rigid solar panels. Collaborating with NASA and origami expert Robert Lang, their model origami solar array could be transported into space expand to almost 10 times its stored size once unfolded.

This Artist Launched Plants Into the Stratosphere

Flowers are one of the most beautiful gifts from nature, but they look even more beautiful contrasted with the deep abyss of space. Japanese artist Azuma Makoto along with John Powell, of JP Aerospace, and a 10-person crew team, launched a white pine bonsai in a light metal frame as well as a bouquet 30 flower species including peace lilies, hydrangeas, and orchids into the stratosphere. These floral installations were sent into space in the dead of night at 2am from the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, which hosts Burning Man. The called their mission Exobiotanica and with 6 Go Pro video cameras and still cameras donated by Fuji Film, the team was able to capture the beautiful sight.

Party Beneath the Space Shuttle Endeavour

For some of us non-astronauts, the closest we will get to outer space is to be in the presence of something that has been in space. That’s why attending or hosting an event at the California Science Center Los Angeles is pretty flipping awesome. In the Samuel Oschin Pavillion, the space shuttle Endeavour, which spent 296 days in space, floats overhead as people beneath celebrate Earthly accomplishments like weddings and corporate parties. Check out the videos below to see how awesome the lighting looks in this space ship’s retirement home.