Falling Snowflakes Captured in 3D

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Snowflakes have been something we’ve marveled at for centuries. The idea that no two are exactly alike, the way that some are good for snowballs and others are not, and the way that they are formed have always been topics of interest. Now a team at University of Utah, lead by atmospheric scientist Tim Garret, have created a super high speed camera set that can take 3D images of snowflakes in mid-air. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) is triggered by infrared sensors to capture snowflakes as they fall from the sky and can capture thousands of images each night.

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Visualizing The Chemistry of Snowflakes

The Chemisrry of Snowflakes

It’s the end of a natural process that many of us see millions of times every year – the creation of tiny snowflakes which together build the white wonderland of winter snow. But, just how many of us have really looked into what happens behind that process? How exactly does a snowflake form?

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Snowflakes in Macro Form

In the Northern hemisphere, Winter is approaching. Snow has come to the colder parts of the planet and people are bundling up and staying inside more often. In Russia, snow is commonplace throughout most of the vast nation and with it come snowflakes.

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