Utopian Sculptures Made from the Natural World

German artist Nils-Udo has been creating art using the natural world for over four decades. As a land artist, he uses objects found on location to create each piece – from bright red berries, to sticks, leaves and stalks of grass. Each piece is created as a response to the landscape around him, often revealing themselves as doors, nests or an outpouring of nature’s abundance.

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Skaters Build a Railroad Riding Half-Pipe & Rowboat Ramp in the Latest Film From Zenga Bros.

You might recall the Zenga Bros. from their energy charged, nostalgia inducing film Ski Boys (and if you haven’t seen it yet, I’m envious). Now they’re back with a new short that’s equally enthralling. They worked with a load of skaters to create imaginatively artistic mobile skate ramps like you’ve never seen before. One is a railroad-traveling half-pipe with a conductors cabin on either end. Just roll it down the rails for a different view.

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Let the Light Shine Through: Ramon Todo Creates Stone with Glass Inserted in the Middle

Artist Ramon Todo makes strange sculptures which combine the strikingly different textures of stone and glass. His work, looking much like man-made geodes, uses materials from river rock, to volcanic stone, to graffiti covered pieces of the Berlin wall. His glass additions perfectly match the shape of his found stones, creating a surprising luminous transition where the light is able to shine through.

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A Magical Look Inside Utah’s Ice Castle, Captured by Photographer Sam Scholes

Like a mythical yeti’s cave or a home fit for the ice queen, this Ice Castle in Utah is something beautiful and mysterious to behold. Photographer Sam Scholes visited the hand built ice structure to capture it as the sun went down and the lights came on. Simply incredible.

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James Dyson’s ‘Impossible’ Uphill Fountain

You probably know the name James Dyson because of his unusual cyclone vacuum cleaners or his seemingly impossible bladeless fans, but you probably didn’t know the famed industrial designer also built a fountain. For the Royal Horticultural Society’s Chelsea Flower Show way back in 2003, he created an M.C. Escher inspired fountain that looks like it convinced water to flow impossibly uphill. The reason we write about it here is because its trick is decidedly clever. How did he do it?

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Deep, Dark Forests Sculpted from Cardboard

Sculptor Eva Jospin makes art that completes a circle. She creates dense, dark forests out a material which they ultimately produce – sheets of cardboard. Cutting, layering and gluing the waste product into scenes with surprising depth, one could almost imagine taking a wander amongst their dark trunks, roots and leaves.

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Bizarre Sculptures Rotate The Face 360 Degrees

Italian artist Gianluca Traina creates bizarre sculptures with the form of the human head. The image of the face, however, is rotated far off center. Her series, entitled “Portrait 360” uses a combination of 2D and 3D work to realize sculpture that is difficult to clearly identify – but that’s just the point.

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A Gigantic Sculpture Cast from the Trunk of a 140-Year-Old Hemlock Tree

Seattle-based artist John Grade has created a sculpture precisely shaped from the living trunk of a 140-year-old Western Hemlock tree growing in North Bend, Washington. Built from a latticework comprised of hundreds of thousands of salvaged old-growth cedar blocks, the story behind its construction (and ultimate fate) is almost as beautiful as its light-filled form.

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Downright Creepy Ceramics from Israeli Artist Ronit Baranga

Some people get nervous about eating unusual foods, but it’s not often anyone gets creeped out by their dinnerware. Israeli ceramicist Ronit Baranga creates the kind of work which can elicit exactly that reaction. Her works feature open mouths and grasping fingers jutting out of classic plates, tea cups and platters. It’s enough to make anyone think twice.

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No-Frizz Flora and Fauna: Gorgeous Nature-Inspired Headdresses by Takaya

The models below are most certainly having a good hair day—with a little help from Japanese floral artist Takaya. Using fresh-cut blooms, berries, leaves, and even stuffed birds, Takaya crafts monumental wearable sculptures that are sure to turn heads.

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