Paper Goes Viral: Cellular Sculptures By Charles Clary

clary-7

Germs never looked so clean-cut until they met artist Charles Clary. A painter and papercrafting artist originally from Tennessee, Clary uses an Xacto knife to dissect hundreds of colorful sheets, which he stacks to create beautiful molecular reliefs. Resembling delicate microbial colonies that contaminate the walls they touch–while simultaneously evoking sound waves, fractals, and topographical landscapes–his works transform simple two-dimensional surfaces into pulsing, surreal structures. 

Brilliant Suspensions In Time: High-Speed Liquid Photography

dropping-7

Thankfully, oil and ink don’t mix–which makes these dazzling photographs by Alberto Seveso possible. In his “Dropping” series, the Italian artist drips colored inks into oil, photographs the splash, then flips the resulting image upside down. The collision of oil and ink results in an exuberant dance of suspended droplets, which Seveso documents as saturated molten sculptures.

Missing NASA? Here are Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency’s Archive: Observing the Earth

earth-1

Unless you’re one of those cool people who makes a daily trip to space via NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day, you might not have noticed that the long running and much loved site is currently down. The site has been running consistently for over 18 years in a co-effort between NASA and Michigan Technological University… but due to some unexpected budget cuts amounting to a 97% cut in workforce (and in other news much of the US federal government), we’re not getting our daily dose of fascinating imagery from outer space.

This is An Orchid Mantis: 5 Praying Mantis Species That Will Blow Your Mind (or Give You Nightmares)

1

What do you think about when your hear ‘mantis‘? Do you think of the standard green insect in praying pose we are all familiar with? Do you think of females eating their mates after sex? Those are both real-life examples of the mantis, but far from the most surprising. Enter 5 mantis species that are masters of camouflage and the stealthy attack.

Awesomely Nerdy Tattoos, Drawn by Science

Science Tattoos 2

Tattoos are an incredible, and indelible, way to make a statement. Sometimes that’s simply that you love parties and dolphins (like, a lot!!)… and other times it is a confession of how much you love science (my ♥ ≥ ∞). In 2007 Carl Zimmer, science writer for Discover Magazine, the New York Times and author of 6 books asked a question on his blog: “Are Scientists Hiding Tattoos of Their Science?” The answer has been overwhelmingly “yes!”

The Inspiring Artwork of Paper Engineer Matt Shlian (and How It’s Inspiring Nano-Scientists)

Matt Schlian paper engeneer 2Matt Schlian paper engeneer 4

Matt Shlian started school as a ceramicist… but it was only when he realized that he was “interested in everything” that his work really took off. He creates sculptural artworks from flat pieces of paper that show the incredible diversity of the medium while creating beautifully inspiring forms. They are also doing something rather surprising: inspiring scientists.

Art On The Ground: Postmodern Landscapes By Charles Jencks

charles-jencks-3[2]

Charles Jencks’ sinuous sculptures are no ordinary walk in the park. A celebrated postmodern architect, designer, and theorist, Jencks tows the line between design, science, and nature to create dramatic forms that swoop across the the British landscape he calls home.

Exploding Lightbulbs Filled With Colorful Surprises

1 Light Bulbs Exploding by Jon Smith

Not every artist is able to do art full time, but the need for that creative outlet never goes away. Scientist Jon Smith of Wide Eyed Illuminations is one example of this. The self-taught photographer learned the art scientifically- through experimentation, trial and error. His specialty is filling light bulbs with random, often colorful materials, and capturing them just as they shatter (after he shoots them), releasing all of their contents in an explosive burst. Why lightbulbs? Smith loves that they are such a common household object that most people ignore them- he loves giving them life and energy- out of their normal element and showing people the amazing moment that is normally unseen when one shatters.

Otherworldly Sound Absorbent Research Facility

1 Microwave Anechoic Chamber

Scientists are always creating unique controlled environments to test products and hypotheses, but sometimes creating these conditions becomes just as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional. English photographer Alastair Philip Wiper gives us an inside look at such facilities, finding their “unintentional beauty”. In an exhibit called Solar/Anechoic, Wiper artistically photographs the world’s largest solar furnace and the anechoic chambers at the Technical University of Denmark. Show here is a selection of photos from the echo-free chambers used to take transmission measurements between microwave antennas and measure how much noise different audio devices make. From some angles the carbon filled foam spikes, look like freshly sharpened blue pencils- until you see them in scale and realize how massive they are.

Moving Atoms: Making The World’s Smallest Movie

1 IBM ATOM FILM

Grab some popcorn, because you are about to see the World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film (Guinness World Records approved)! Created by IBM researchers, the movie stars 5,000 carbon monoxide atoms magnified over 100 million times on a scanning tunneling microscope. The team moved actual atoms frame by frame to tell the story of a boy named Adam and his atom! To keep the atoms still, the conditions were -260 degrees centigrade. Moving atoms, not only makes a fascinating little movie, but the implications for atomic memory in computers that will come from this research will allow devices to get even smaller.