Stunning Sand Mandalas Appear Before Your Eyes

After practicing medicine for several years, scientist and artist Bruce Shapiro become obsessed with the art of motion control. He was so impessed with the infinite possibilites of designs and images that could be created via computer programs. With awesome visual installations at science centers throughout the world, he has used art to turn science into something everyone can appreciate. The Sisyphus Machine is his take on a modern Zen Garden. Appopriately named after Sisyphus, who in Greek mythology received the punishment of pushing a huge boulder up a hill for all of eternity, the kinetic drawing machine uses magnets to push a steel ball through sand, leaving behind beautiful mandala-like patterns.

Artist Uses Scientific Methods to Capture Paint in Motion

Swiss artist Fabian Oefner uses paint to show us the world—in the most unconventional ways. He creates colorful psychadelics pieces using scientific methods in an effort to shed light on the wonderful natural world. Utilizing high-speed photography, Oefner captures vibrant paints as they are distorted by forces of nature, such as wind, sound, magnetism, and centripetal forces.

Flyte Sets The Lightbulb Free With This New Levitating Lightbulb

If you like to decorate your home with conversation pieces, then look no further. Fascinated with hover boards since he was a teenager, Simon Morris began studying magnetic levitation. After 5 years of research and development, he is ready to launch his amazing new design, Flyte. Flyte is a levitating light bulb that is probably the coolest way to light your home or office. Using magnets and induction, the bulb is powered through the air. With sustainable sourced oak, ash, and walnut the base is eco-friendly and has an awesome bonus: you can set your phone on it to charge up when you aren’t using the light! A simple tap of the base turns the bulb on and it not only floats above, but it also spins in circles. How cool is that?

This Medical Student Has Made Studying Anatomy So Much Sweeter

There is a reason why not everyone is a doctor. Learning anatomy is no easy task. But 27 year old medical student Mike McCormick has developed a sweet way to help himself study. He re-creates human anatomy diagrams using various candies to represent the parts. With neat labeling and colorful candies, these figures are more fun than any anatomy textbook could ever be. Plus the hands on learning approach makes memorization sink in much more easily.

A Portrait of Albert Einstein Made From 2200 Dice

A couple years ago, Redditor Joshie196 created a computer program that allowed him to turn any image into a dice mosaic. Combining his project with Einstein’s famous quote, “As I have said so many times, God doesn’t play dice with the world,” he turned 2200 dice into the face of this great scientist. The finished product weighs nearly 25lbs. He plans on inscribing Einsteins’ quote on the bottom of the frame and is willing to sell the work if the price is right. It cost over $350 to make and shipping would not be cheap due to its heavy weight.

Study on Dr. Oz: Over Half of His Advice Has No Proof or Contradicts Science

Just because Dr. Oz has “doctor” in his name doesn’t mean his advice should be trusted. That’s the news from a recent study focused on fact-checking the television host’s medical show, which found that more than half of his health recommendations had no supporting evidence or outright contradicted the best available evidence.

Mind-Blowing, Laser Cut, Mathematical Art Lights Up the World

You may have seen the beautiful works of Cozo Designs, as fractal night lights on the Playa at Burning Man. The beautiful, laser cut, mathematical designs shine light in stunning patterns across the ground. The large installations HYBYCOZO got double the funding through Kickstarter and have traveled to festivals all over the US. Now Cozo Designs, led by Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu of San Francisco, makes a home sized version of their awe-inspiring designs. According to the team, “The patterns represents the many ways, people, over thousands of years, have derived meaning and connection from geometry and natural patterns, on both the molecular and spiritual level, and shared it with each other through the arts.”

Cute Little Pathogens: Colorful Microbe Embroidery By Alicia Watkins

Many artists have been inspired by the remarkable shapes of the microscopic world. Glass blower Luke Jerram sculpted beautiful maladies out of glass and now Alicia Watkins combines crafting with science with her colorful embroidery. Germs have never looked so cute as they do in these colorful cross-stitched patterns.

Willard Wigan Makes the Smallest Handmade Sculpture in History…In a Piece of Beard Stubble

Using a single hollowed out piece of his own beard stubble, microscopy artist Willard Wigan has created the world’s smallest sculpture. Under the microscope he turned a tiny flake of gold into a motorbike and inserted it into the 0.0035inch piece of stubble. With patience, dexterity, and extreme focus, Wigan has to hold his breath and make his movements between heartbeats. He challenges himself to make each fragile, miniature masterpieces more detailed and smaller than the previous ones. He has created several sculptures in the eye of a needle, but this beard stubble one gives a whole new meaning to the word tiny.

Scientists Have Confirmed the Average Penis Size, and It’s Not What You Think

Ok guys, it’s a moment of truth. Although locker room banter would have you believing every man was hung like a horse, a recent study has revealed that average penis size is something a bit more modest: 5.16 inches, erect. Not only that, but based on the 15,521 males from around the world who were measured, the number of men at the very top and very bottom of the scale are few and far between. Yes, we know you’re running to get a tape measure.