Mind-Blowing, Laser Cut, Mathematical Art Lights Up the World

You may have seen the beautiful works of Cozo Designs, as fractal night lights on the Playa at Burning Man. The beautiful, laser cut, mathematical designs shine light in stunning patterns across the ground. The large installations HYBYCOZO got double the funding through Kickstarter and have traveled to festivals all over the US. Now Cozo Designs, led by Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu of San Francisco, makes a home sized version of their awe-inspiring designs. According to the team, “The patterns represents the many ways, people, over thousands of years, have derived meaning and connection from geometry and natural patterns, on both the molecular and spiritual level, and shared it with each other through the arts.”

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Cute Little Pathogens: Colorful Microbe Embroidery By Alicia Watkins

Many artists have been inspired by the remarkable shapes of the microscopic world. Glass blower Luke Jerram sculpted beautiful maladies out of glass and now Alicia Watkins combines crafting with science with her colorful embroidery. Germs have never looked so cute as they do in these colorful cross-stitched patterns.

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Willard Wigan Makes the Smallest Handmade Sculpture in History…In a Piece of Beard Stubble

Using a single hollowed out piece of his own beard stubble, microscopy artist Willard Wigan has created the world’s smallest sculpture. Under the microscope he turned a tiny flake of gold into a motorbike and inserted it into the 0.0035inch piece of stubble. With patience, dexterity, and extreme focus, Wigan has to hold his breath and make his movements between heartbeats. He challenges himself to make each fragile, miniature masterpieces more detailed and smaller than the previous ones. He has created several sculptures in the eye of a needle, but this beard stubble one gives a whole new meaning to the word tiny.

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Buddha Statue Discovered To Contain The Mummified Remains of A Monk From 1100AD

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You can’t judge a book by it’s cover and apparently the saying goes for statues too. For centuries it was thought that this Buddha statue is just that, but a recent CT scan reveals that it is actually the vessel for the mummified remains of Chinese Buddhist master Liuquan. He lived over 900 years ago, around the year 1100 AD and his body has been preserved in this statue.

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If The Moon and Mars Had Oceans, What Would They Look Like?

Humans have long dreamt of living on other planets, but last time we checked they weren’t too keen on setting up permanent residence on the red dusty plains of Mars or even on a Moon mountain. The climate on those two celestial bodies isn’t exactly inviting – but there are plenty of people who dream of changing that. Terraforming is the theoretical process of modifying a planet to make it more Earth-like, and these two fascinating maps from data scientist Seth Kadish show what it could look like on Mars and the Moon.

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Drawing Mushrooms With Sound: A Must-See Oscilloscope Project For The Inquiring Mind

Remember in elementary school when you learned to create words on your upside down calculator? This is kinda like that only 1000 times cooler. Using an analog oscilloscope, Jerobeam Fenderson figured out how to draw a mushroom with sound. Not just any mushroom, a moving one, and then multiple mushrooms. Get your earphones (lower the volume), pop some popcorn, and click on the video below.

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Learn The Incredible Physics Behind Falling Dominos

In this video, Stephen Morris gives a fantastic demonstration of how dominos work. He uses a collection of dominos made from steel, with each one 1.5x larger than the one toppling before it. Pushing over the minuscule first domino (just 5mm high and 1mm thick) starts a chain reaction that looks nearly impossible – especially when it knocks over the last domino that weighs over 100lbs.

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Fascinating: This Animated GIF Shows 3 Different Ways To Breathe

Hey there, Air Breathing Mammal. Think you get oxygen just like the other creatures around? Not even close. Eleanor Lutz is at it again, continuing her series of designerly graphics that teach us fascinating science. This installment features a GIF animation of how three different animals breathe: humans, birds, and grasshoppers. For something as simple as “suck air in, blow air out”, this graphic shows a striking diversity of what happens to that breath once it’s inside the body.

Now you’ll know why birds are active on mountain peaks where you won’t find any mammals.

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Redditor Captures A Rare Fireball Meteor on Video

Ben Lewis recently enlisted the help of astronomy loving Redditors to identify a mysterious looking cloud he captured while filming the night sky. What he found out was surprising. He’d managed to accidentally capture a rare sky event – a giant bolide meteor, or fireball, as it burned up in the earth’s atmosphere. Even more rare, was that he framed it beautifully in the tree foliage above. The video below does a good job showing the red cloudy streak the meteor left in its wake.

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Watching Virtual Creatures Learn How to Walk is Surprisingly Hilarious

This is one of those awesome examples where good science is also hilarious fun. For his PHD thesis, Thomas Geijtenbeek taught virtual creatures how to walk, and even though his subjects aren’t real, their journey to moving forward followed a surprisingly lifelike path: face-plants galore.

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