The Moscow Metro Looks Like An Underground Palace

There are many places to explore in Moscow, but one path not to be missed is the metro stations, which are quite glamorous. The Moscow Metro opened in 1935, consisting of thirteen stations on a single line extending 11 kilometers (6.83 miles) long. Since then, the system has grown into the 4th busiest in the world, with over 300 km (186.4 miles) of line and 188 stops.

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33 Soviet Propaganda Posters of the Space Age

The Soviet propaganda machine was running strong in the early to mid 20th century, and when it came to their highly successful space program, the artists creating the omnipresent posters had truly hit gold.

On 4 October 1957, the country launched humanities first earth satellite, Sputnik, and stunned people the world over as they watched it fly overhead in the night sky (this is the October referred to in many of the posters below). Their program launched the first animals into space, and in 1961 sent Yuri Gagarin on his historic single orbit as the very first human (“Восто́к” in Russian can be seen in many of these posters honoring his Vostok spacecraft). They launched the first woman into space in 1963, beating America by almost exactly 20 years. And those are just a few of their ‘firsts.’

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Crumbling Soviet-Era Architecture from a Photographer Accused of Espionage

It’s not every day people go urban exploring in Russia, but English photographer Rebecca Litchfield did it. Over 10 trips into previously Soviet regions she ducked behind fences, risked radiation exposure, was arrested, interrogated and even accused of espionage – all in the name of documenting the relics of the fallen Soviet Union. Her collection of images and the book she recently published are titled Soviet Ghosts.

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These Hermits Have Chosen To Live Alone In The Wild

Society is not always the most welcoming place for all types of people and some have chosen to live their lives outside of the norm. Russian photographer Danila Tkachenko captures the wild lives of people who have left communities behind to live alone in the forest. Working with the land, they create homes among the trees in the Russian and Ukranian forest. He has compiled his collection of photographs in a book called Escape.

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Moscow to Get Futuristic “Batmobile” Trams That Run 50km on Batteries Alone

Already dubbed the “iPhone on rails” and the “Batmobile,” Moscow streets may soon be rolling with these highly futuristic new trams called the Russia One, or R1. Debuted last week by tank and train maker Uralvagonzavod, or UVZ, the next-generation tram looks to bring an ultra-modern transportation system to thousands of miles of Soviet-era tracks.

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City of Shadows: Ghostly Figures Wander Post-Soviet St. Petersburg

In the aftermath of the Soviet Union’s collapse, people wandered the northern city of St. Petersburg like shadows of their former selves. It was the beginning of 1992, the middle of winter, and photographer Alexey Titarenko was walking the streets of his native city during a short, dark day. The strange quiet of the once joyful and dynamic place struck him, as did the empty shelves in stores and the desperation on the faces of a population caught up in the midst of political upheaval. He pulled out his camera.

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This Russian Salt Mine is a Strange Psychedelic Wonderland

Near the Russian city of Yekaterinburg, more than 650 feet below the surface, is a salt mine straight out of a psychedelic drug trip. The walls, ceilings and floors are covered with colorful swirls of reds, yellows, golds and even blues caused by natural layers of mineral carnallite – a source of magnesium, and mainly used in the manufacturing of fertilizers. Here the hidden minerals have been revealed as excavating tools created subterranean tubular labyrinths that stretch for miles. Most of the mine is abandoned now (requiring special permission to enter) but photographer Mikhail Mishainik made his way underground to capture the eerie place for all to see.

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The Sochi Project: Documenting the Location Before the Games

While watching the glory of the Olympic games unfold, it’s interesting to reflect on the dynamic area where the games are taking place. The Sochi Project is a documentary photography work initiated in 2007 by Rob Hornstra and writer Arnold van Bruggen. The two were baffled by the decision to hold the games in an area where mere miles separated playboy Russian millionaires and bleak war zones, and where facilities for staging such a massive world event were largely nonexistent.

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Sasha Unisex Will Make You Want All of Her Colorful Tattoos

I’ll admit it, I’m a tattoo virgin – but if I was going to get inked, I’d want my first date to be with Sasha Unisex. Her painterly tattoos are colorful and filled with imaginatively hued animal life that convey a load of emotion. When I say painterly I mean it too – before putting her work on skin, she does a precise watercolor of her design, getting all the details right before making it permanent.

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Photos of Bizarre Post-Soviet Era Buildings

Photographer Frank Herfort had one mission when he embarked on a 15,000 mile road-trip tour of post-USSR countries: to capture the most bizarre architecture in the land. After the Soviet Union fell, many cities previously under communist rule began to build grandiose, colorful structures – many with the intention to impress and symbolize a new day. Herfort traveled from Moscow to the Russian/Chinese border on the eastern side and everywhere in between.

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