Photojournalist to Syrian Rebels: What do you carry?

The Things They Carry Sebastiano Tomada Piccolomini_06

“They killed my mother and father. I will kill them with my knife. I will kill them like I would kill a goat,” says Kachadur Manukian, the 25 year old Syrian fighter above. The darkly vignetted image is the work of photojournalist Sebastiano Tomada Piccolomini, who spent 2012 with Syrian rebels as they fought against soldiers loyal to the regime.

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Wild Car Wrecks From the Golden Age of the Automobile

For the younger generations it might be hard to imagine a time before seat belts, airbags and crumple zones were standard features in cars, but it wasn’t really that long ago. These astounding photos capture the golden age of the automobile around Boston Massachusetts in the 1920s and 1930s, showing the aftermath of car wrecks in the simple yet speedy cars of the era. At the time, cars had become affordable to the masses, but when you consider that people were not required to take a driving test of any sort, and drinking and driving was legal unless you were considered outright intoxicated, it’s not surprising that these wild wrecks happened frequently.

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Kalahari 47°: The Heat of Africa on Oven Toasted Prints

Covering most of Botswana and good portions of Namibia and South Africa, the semi-arid Kalahari desert is home to a host of wild animals and diverse peoples. The harsh area takes its name from local dialects, literally meaning “a waterless place,” and sees less than 7 inches of rain annually. The wide plain has a stark beauty, and is colored with the bright sun and dry dust of the earth.

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In Remembrance: Photojournalists Killed in Libya

The photography and film world sadly lost two of their own on Wednesday. Oscar-nominated war-film director Tim Hetherington and second-prize winning photojournalist Chris Hondros both lost their lives while covering a battle between Libyan government forces and rebel fighters in the city of Misrata.

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Interactive Journalism: Putting You In The War

Since the dawn of photojournalism in the mid 19th century and then with the advent of video journalism, observers have been confined to viewing the single perspective originally captured by the photographer. Enter Condition One, an immersive, interactive way to capture and replay journalism footage. The days of one viewpoint are numbered.

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