Erik Solheim Took 3888 Pictures of His Yard to Capture The Four Seasons in One Image

Eirik Solheim spent an entire year capturing the changing seasons from one window of his house in Oslo, Norway. The artist, hacker and all-around interesting fellow was using an old SLR set to capture one image every 30 minutes for the whole year (this was back in 2010). When the year was over he selected 3,888 images from the 16000 total (to match the 3888×2592 pixel resolution of his camera). Then he used a custom script to take the first line of pixels from the first image, the second line from the second image, and so on. In the resulting picture, we see January on the left and December on the right. The whole year arrayed in one-pixel-wide slices. Fantastic.

Share:

Touching Self-portraits Document the Psychological Journey of Grieving Death

After losing her fiancé in a helicopter crash in 2012, Sarah Treanor quit her job as a graphic designer to pursue a deeply emotional exploration of grief through photography. The creative endeavor is symbolic of her psychological experience in process and in imagery, and captures the essence of the dark, peaceful, and disorienting journey of mourning. The heart-wrenching feeling the images evoke is universally familiar and carefully dissects the most difficult aspect of the human experience – death.

Share:

Dutch Artist Stretches the Skin in Unusual Ways (It’s Not Photoshop)

At first glance one would assume that these manipulations were done digitally, but they were not. In her latest photographic series, Dutch artist Juuke Schoorl explores the malleability of the human skin. Utilizing simple techniques to modify the shape and texture of her subject’s bodies, it’s interesting to see just how much the appearance of skin can change with the lightest of alterations. Her project, titled REK (“STRETCH” in Dutch), used materials as conventional as tape, nylon string and thin plastic rods to shape the subject before shooting.

Share:

Icelandic Twin Girls in Beautiful & Haunting Photographs by Ariko Inaoka

Every year since 2009, identical twins Erna and Hrefna are visited by Japanese photographer Ariko Inaoka at their home in downtown Reykjavik, Iceland. Spending 3 or 4 weeks with them each summer, Inaoka’s beautiful and surreal images capture the growing girls and their wonderfully unique relationship with each other–which sometimes borders on the telepathic.

Share:

Seeing Red: Richard Mosse’s Unbelievable Photographs Of The Congo

Seas of green become magenta through the lens of Irish documentary photographer Richard Mosse. The 2014 winner of the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize and 2013 Irish representative at the Venice Biennale, Mosse uses vintage infrared film to present a vivid look at the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Share:

“Pinhole Selfies” Combine the Oldest Photo Techniques with Modern Culture

The “selfie” is probably the most common photo theme of today, and that’s likely because of how easy we can take pictures. Just a quick snap with your smartphone and it’s uploaded to any social network you want. Lithuania-born, Sweden-based photographer Ignas Kutavicius is imagining the world before all this ease, taking his vision of the selfie all the way back to the dawn of photography when cameras didn’t even have a lense. His “Pinhole Selfies” are an ingenious mix of modern culture and the oldest photo technology – the camera obscura or pinhole camera.

Share:

This Artist Uses Snapchat Doodling To Make Unsuspecting Strangers Look A Lot More Interesting

There is more to Snapchat than just sending selfies. A Norwegian Instagrammer who goes by the username @geeohsnap refrains from selfies and even people he knows. His Snapchat forte involves complete strangers. He uses the app to doodle colorful characters and accents into the scene, making the world a whole lot brighter. From giant bear hugs with cuddly pandas and grizzlies to koala bear ambushes and famous cartoon characters, @geeohsnap never seems to run out of new ideas. The doodles are also used to keep the unsuspecting strangers anonymous.

Share:

Photographer Brings The Outside In (Or The Inside Out?)

What if walls had leaves and trees had windows? These are the kind of questions that artist Carolyn Lefley explores in her recent photo series Realm. Using Photoshop, she layers images of natural settings over humble interiors, creating beautiful and impossible images in which architecture and landscape become one.

Share:

Photographer Uses Brain Scanner to Find Out How People Wish They Looked

A straighter nose, bigger eyes, higher cheekbones: in a culture that glorifies physical perfection, many of us can immediately identify traits we would like to change about ourselves. Using a unique combination of photography and neuroscience, Scott Chasserot attempts to capture images of our perfect selves through his project Original/Ideal.

Share:

Photographer Circles Globe to Capture Sunsets in Every Time Zone, In Just 8 Hours

Simon Roberts got to do something no photographer has done before – capture a sunset in every time zone around the world, in just one day.

The challenging project was launched to promote the Satellite Wave watch from Citizen, which automatically adjusts to the local time zone (something quite unique for a wristwatch). Their project took Roberts far north to 80 degrees latitude – close enough to the earth’s axis that the plane could keep up with the setting sun. At that position, they were able to fly against the earth’s rotation (it’s moving at just 180 mph that far north) enabling the plane to stay positioned in a permanent sunset as they traveled around the globe. (You’re nearly doing the same thing when you take a northern flight from east to west. Notice how LOOOONG the sun takes to set as you chase it.)

At precisely 6:30 PM in every time zone, Roberts photographed a sunset. The final video is called “Chasing Horizons”

Share: