Concealed: Images of Texas Women with Their Guns

Loaded handguns can go off accidentally. When in a bag, they can rub against other objects which may deactivate the safety and even fire a bullet. In Houston, Texas a few years back, that exact scenario occurred at a women’s hair salon when a patrons gun went off in her purse.

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What to Wear in 1906: A Street Fashion Photographer From Edwardian Engand

Over a century before The Sartorialist was stopping fashionable people to capture their unique sense of style, photographer Edward Linley Sambourne (1844-1910) was documenting the street fashion of Edwardian England. Sambourne worked as chief cartoonist for the English magazine Punch, and as an illustrator. When he first picked up photography, it was to use as reference to improve upon his other arts, but soon it turned into an obsession.

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A Chinese Meter-Reader Captures Unexpected Moments on the Street

Tao Liu doesn’t take your average street photographs, but then again, he’s not your average street photographer either. The 32-year-old from Hefei, China, is a water-meter reader for the Hefei Water Supply Company. He spends his days riding the city streets on his motorcycle while collecting businesses’ water usage. But after his long day he puts his trusty Fujifilm X100 rangefinder to work.

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Life Hack: How to Use Your Wallet as a Smartphone Tripod

Even with a self-timer added to most modern smartphone camera apps, getting a hands-free shot is not the easiest task. With their current thinner-is-better form factor, getting a phone to balance on anything but one tiny edge is a challenge, and even leaning them against an object isn’t too practical. Thankfully, Youtuber Bang Ong has a simple and smart life hack. Here he demonstrates how to use just your wallet to accurately aim your phone in all kinds of directions. Cool!

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Every Year for Christmas, This Photographer Dresses Up His Dog

20 years ago, photographer Peter Thorpe started a wonderful Christmas tradition. For his annual holiday card he enlists the help of his dog, using elaborate costumes to transform him into different animals. It’s hilarious fun, and very, very clever.

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PrintSnap: A Home-Built Camera That Prints on Receipt Paper (and Almost for Free)

Holding a physical photograph is a rarity in this age of digital photography, but Seattle-based electrical engineer Michael Ciuffo has come up with an unusual way to put lots of images on paper for very, very little cash. He’s using an ordinary roll of receipt paper as his instant film.

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Photographer Builds Detailed Sets in the Streets of New York (Then Leaves Them for People to Enjoy)

Walk down the street in New York and you could see a living room, bedroom or bathroom right on the sidewalk. It’s an ongoing art project from photographer Justin Bettman and stylist Gozde Eker called Set in the Street. It sees the duo building elaborate sets right out in the open using discarded materials and furniture. In fact, most of their materials are found on the street and have simply changed locations.

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Erik Solheim Took 3888 Pictures of His Yard to Capture The Four Seasons in One Image

Eirik Solheim spent an entire year capturing the changing seasons from one window of his house in Oslo, Norway. The artist, hacker and all-around interesting fellow was using an old SLR set to capture one image every 30 minutes for the whole year (this was back in 2010). When the year was over he selected 3,888 images from the 16000 total (to match the 3888×2592 pixel resolution of his camera). Then he used a custom script to take the first line of pixels from the first image, the second line from the second image, and so on. In the resulting picture, we see January on the left and December on the right. The whole year arrayed in one-pixel-wide slices. Fantastic.

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Touching Self-portraits Document the Psychological Journey of Grieving Death

After losing her fiancé in a helicopter crash in 2012, Sarah Treanor quit her job as a graphic designer to pursue a deeply emotional exploration of grief through photography. The creative endeavor is symbolic of her psychological experience in process and in imagery, and captures the essence of the dark, peaceful, and disorienting journey of mourning. The heart-wrenching feeling the images evoke is universally familiar and carefully dissects the most difficult aspect of the human experience – death.

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Dutch Artist Stretches the Skin in Unusual Ways (It’s Not Photoshop)

At first glance one would assume that these manipulations were done digitally, but they were not. In her latest photographic series, Dutch artist Juuke Schoorl explores the malleability of the human skin. Utilizing simple techniques to modify the shape and texture of her subject’s bodies, it’s interesting to see just how much the appearance of skin can change with the lightest of alterations. Her project, titled REK (“STRETCH” in Dutch), used materials as conventional as tape, nylon string and thin plastic rods to shape the subject before shooting.

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