Thomas Richner Built a Millennium Falcon from a Basement Full of Cardboard Boxes

…in a basement far, far away (well actually Columbus, Ohio), animation artist Thomas Richner had a big mess of boxes to clean up. He had two options: recycle them responsibly, or build a 5 foot long model of the Millennium Falcon. We’re sure glad they didn’t go to waste.

One hundred and forty hours later (and a whole lot of glue) the Star Wars model is complete, and so realistic it almost looks like a still from the movie when filmed in front of a green screen. Let’s take a trip through Richner’s process from humble start to hyperdrive finish.

Share:

Man Builds Giant Kinetic Art Piece Using 100,000 K’Nex

I’m sure you’ve seen some form of kinetic ball machine before. Small balls are lifted to the top of long rollercoaster-like tracks and dropped through a series of fascinating paths until they reach the bottom – only to be scooped up again for another ride. Austin Granger is no stranger to these machines, but uniquely, he’s been building them for the last few years out of the K’Nex construction toy system. Now, he’s topped all his other efforts, creating a massive 23.5 foot tall, 40 foot long machine using over 100,000 pieces!

Share:

Massive Model of Rivendell From The Hobbit and LOTR, Built with 200,000 LEGOs

When it comes to Middle-earth, there are few places more beautiful than Rivendell. Home of the elves, this magically lit outpost from The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings could easily be paradise… even if it’s built out of LEGOs. Alice Finch recently teamed up with David Frank to create an insanely massive model of the place using around 200,000 LEGO pieces to complete!

Share:

Disintegrating: Exploded Exotic Cars by Fabian Oefner

Fabian Oefner Exploded Exotic Cars 3_2

In the blink of an eye, the classic Mercedes stopped in front of you perfectly explodes into a million pieces, spraying mufflers, brake calipers and intake manifolds high into the air. At least that’s what it looks like is happening in Fabian Oefner’s surprising new series. We’re fond to Oefner’s visually stunning work, but usually it involves slinging paint around his immaculately clean studio, or at least playing with ferrofluid, magnets and water colors – this series is something completely new. And don’t worry, no classic cars were harmed in the making of these images – despite how real they look, these are actually tiny models.

Share:

Need a New Boat? Just Break Out the Parts and Build it with a Life-Sized Assemble Kit

toysrus_dinghy-2toysrus_dinghy-3

When Michael Johansson isn’t treating his art like real-life Tetris, he’s making life-size injection molded “assembly kits” of everyday objects. Need a new hair dryer or lawn mower? Don’t worry, he’s got you covered with all the pieces flat packed on a board, ready to break off and build. His whimsical art pays homage to the plastic model kits of our youth (ok, I’m still obsessed), where our favorite cars, planes and ships were all waiting for us in in one small box.

Share:

Visual Bits #329 >Unbelievably Executed Architecture

Check out your links after the jump.

Share:

Visual Bits #304 > If You Could, Wood You?

Check out your links after the jump!

Share:

Incredible Cardboard: Sets for a Film I’ll Never Make

The word which first comes to mind when observing these new works by Daniel Agdag: meticulous. Already known for an award-winning stop motion film, he has now set his talented hands to the task of creating a series of sculptures: “Sets for a Film I’ll Never Make”. Each astoundingly detailed model is constructed using sliced cardboard and PVA glue – mediums you would hardly associate with such precise work.

Share:

Surprisingly Unusual: Photographs of Small Worlds

A sunny balcony pokes out from the side of a classic brick building, curtains drifting in the breeze behind old green double doors and an open drink waits to be consumed… but not is all as it seems. Disquietingly, we realize this peaceful scene is actually hanging over the smooth, polished tracks of a recently traveled railroad line. Such are the familiar, yet unusual works of miniature artist Frank Kunert

Share:

Mysterious Tiny Rooms

Marc Giai-Miniet builds tiny, exactingly crafted rooms that look swiftly deserted by evil scientists. Painted predominantly monochromatic gray, his libraries, laboratories, sewers and submarines draw the viewer in, arousing curiosity at what events have passed in these grim spaces. To see his other work, cruise by marc-giai-miniet.com.

Share: