TGIF!! Here Are a Bunch of Tiny People Who Are Totally Over It

Oh Friday… what would we do without you? That’s certainly what these tiny people are feeling as they navigate the big world of office life.

Derrick Lin works in advertising, a career he admits can be chaotic and unpredictable. Channeling the challenges of daily work life, he creates miniature scenes of people venting their (and often his) frustrations, then posts them to Instagram and Tumblr. Perhaps you can relate.

Slinkachu’s “Miniaturesque”: More Miniature People Take Over the Urban World

London-based artist Slinkachu (featured previously) has been hard at work creating some of the smallest street art we’ve seen. That’s not to demean its importance (though you might just miss it walking down the street). His tiny miniatures have been cleverly installed all over the city and parklands of London, creating humorous and surprising scenes of tiny figurines interacting with the larger world.

A Teeny Tiny Book of ‘Life’s Lil Pleasures’

Sometimes the smallest things in life are actually the most meaningful. For illustrator and animator Evan Lorenzen, that includes creating very very tiny books. The Denver, Colorado resident has created a exceptionally small read called ‘Life’s lil Pleasures’. It’s filled with just a few pages, but takes us on a meaningful journey from those small but inspiring events, to some which would make you laugh, to some which are utterly bizarre. I love it.

Every Day for Four Years: This Artist Builds Quirky Dioramas from Household Items

Nobody would discount the difficulty of doing a 365 Project or the challenge of sticking to one theme for an entire year – but Japanese artist Tanaka Tatsuya has been doing his creative work every day for the past 4 years. That is impressive. He’s been using everyday objects from around the house – from broccoli and plastic water bottles, to loaves of bread and toilet paper – and transforming them into tiny dioramas that are large on humor.

Penny Sized Drawings Put The Wild West In Your Pocket

San Diego-based artist Sam Larson creates one pretty penny with his charming frontier-inspired miniatures. Through his illustrations of cowboys and campgrounds, that are no bigger than a coin, Larson makes microscopic vistas out of dramatic topography and iconography of the West.

Realistic Street Scenes Created Using Model Cars, Forced-Perspective and a $250 Point & Shoot Camera

Michael Paul Smith Forced Perspective Model Cars 1

Some guys never grow up. For example, I can’t walk by a Hot Wheels toy car display without coveting those tiny 4-wheeled machines – something about my youthful car lust comes back to me. Michael Paul Smith is doing something about it though. This model maker, collector and photographer has been creating inspired forced perspective shots using his small-scale vintage cars, making them look as real as a movie set – or reality for those who remember.

World Famous Landmarks Made to Look Miniature

miniture places around the world 3

When it comes to this world, there are people who see it as vast and locations as distant, and there are some who see it as miniscule. In relation to the solar system and galaxies beyond, our planet is indeed tiny in comparison… and the humans that inhabit it are even smaller. New York based photographer Richard Silver decided that he wanted to capture that reality of being small through his photography. Packing his bags and camera gear, he ventured all over the world to create “miniature shots” from some of the most famous man made structures in the world.

Visual Bits #435 > Reach Out And Sculpt

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Visual Bits #421>Miniatures, Magnetic Putty, & More

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Real Underwater Humor- Without Photoshop

Jason Isley 1

What does Seaweed say when it’s stuck at the bottom of the sea? “Kelp! Kelp!” If you’ve ever eaten Laffy Taffy, then you know there are lots of silly sea jokes, but what’s not funny is the damage that humans are causing to our most mysterious ecosystem. Underwater photographer Jason Isley sees this first hand, so he decided to bring some toys along with him to capture it firsthand. He creates comical scenes, like a sea slug getting a speeding ticket, along with some showcasing more serious environmental concerns, like ghost nets, litter, and fish bombing. Although he does occasionally brighten some images with Photoshop, the miniature scenes are actually set up underwater. Isley is the co-founder of ScubaZoo, a Malaysian underwater filming and photography company.