Data + Design Project

How Do Our Brains Semantically Map the Things We See?

Sunday 12.23.2012 , Posted by

Semantic_space2

At last- neurological research that doesn’t take a brain surgeon to understand it! Researchers from the Gallant Lab at UC Berkeley placed subjects under an MRI while they watched videos with thousands of items labeled by words. They were able to map which part of the brain was stimulated by each word and noticed that similar objects were grouped close to one another. With their research data, they created the first interactive map of how the brain organizes these categories. Interestingly, all of the different people shared a similar semantic map. [Read more…]

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Mappable 3D Data Visualizations in Real-Time

Monday 01.23.2012 , Posted by

If you ever get tired of boring, flat charts in a presentation, then you may want to look at them in 3D and 4D.  An new application called DataAppeal could make the lives of researchers, students, developers, governments, and business representatives much easier; and their data much more understandable. DataAppeal is web-based application, based off of GoogleMaps, that allows the user to map and complete geographic analysis using data, and visualize it in 3D and 4D models. It allows people to represent data in a new way that makes it easier to understand and actually see. Nadia Amoroso, one of the creators of the application says “[DataAppeal] allows the transformation and interpretation of information to be intuitive, understandable, straightforward and fun.” Amoroso answered some of my questions below: [Read more…]

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Anthropocene Mapping: The Human Influence On Earth

Monday 10.31.2011 , Posted by

Ready to learn a new word? Anthropocene. Defined according to wikipedia it is “a recent and informal geologic chronological term that serves to mark the evidence and extent of human activities that have had a significant global impact on the Earth’s ecosystems. The term was coined by ecologist Eugene Stoermer but has been widely popularized by the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen.”

The images here where created by Felix Pharand-Deschenes depicting how various human influences, from road and rail, to internet cables and airlines create significant patterns covering the Earth. What can we learn from these patterns in how they are influencing the environment? [Read more…]

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