What if Major Brand Logos Were Hand-Lettered?

For her graphic design graduate project, Sara Marshall imagined what the intersection between modern brand logos and the classic art of hand-lettering might look like – and it’s very thought-provoking. Like many of us Marshall has noted the trend toward flat, minimalist brand logos. With companies like Microsoft and Google leading the way, the iconography of major companies has lost some of its flair in the name of simplicity, adopting a minimal range of colors and making creative use of negative space.

While there are some good design arguments for going minimal, it doesn’t always have to be so.

World Renowned Graphic Designer Recreates Famous Brand Logos Free Handed With Pen & Ink

With just ink and a calligrapher’s pen, Sebastian Lester can create lettering that looks computer generated. A graphic designer with clients that include NASA, Apple, Nike and The New York Times, he doesn’t even need a computer to create logos. In these short timelapse videos, Lester shows off his skills and perfect proportions as he free hand prints some of the most recognizable logos out there. Lester is one of the highest profile calligraphers in the world and he shares his talents regularly with his followers on Instagram.

What if Hipster Brands Went Mainstream?

Some brands just get copied, others just get the munchies, but these brands have decided to go mainstream. It’s a rough road to take in our designer coffee, typography loving hip culture, but somebody had to do it.

#Filtered: Creative Coffee Drawings By Ben Blake

DSC_1405

Coffee enthusiast Ben Blake proves that Instagram is not a filter’s single origin. On his charming website, Blake uses cone filters–the humble backbones behind your morning brew–as palettes for spirited illustrations celebrating coffee culture. Each illustration is a pen-and-ink ode to a specific roaster, brew, coffeehouse, or speciality coffee experience, many finishing with smooth flourishes and caffeinated exclamation marks. As his drawings range from rich, overflowing landscapes to simple typographic logos, they cleverly pair bold tasting notes with beautiful written ones.

ExxonMobil Goes After FXX For Its Use of Interlocking ‘XX’ in New Logo

exxon-mobil-vs-fxx

ExxonMobil Corp. is none-too-pleased about FX Networks LLC’s latest branch of television programming, FXX. Though, their complaint is a bit different from fans of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia’s qualms of having to tune in to a different channel to catch the programming their used to, ExxonMobil is suing FX Networks to block their use of a logo the oil company says infringes upon their current branding.

Logo Mashups: Two Brands Come Face to Face

Logo Mashups 1Logo Mashups 12

Some logos were just meant to have babies. Take the Crocs logo and set it up with the Lacoste crocodile and what do you get? Some majorly jarring fashion and a logo that fits together all too well. That’s the gist behind Ryan Loomis‘ intriguing project Logo Mashups. He’s taking some of the most iconic brands and matching them with their most appropriate brand buddy.

Still Life with Fruit (Brands included)

CalvinKlein-Yellow-Peper

It’s harmless to put a logo on an object right? Maybe so, and yet it can fully change the way it is perceived. A fruit is something nice, tasty, and full of juicy goodness; yet with the simple addition of a corporate logo (such as Calvin Klein, Gucci or Louis Vuitton) it’s interesting how one will often interpret the object differently.

10 Brand Logos Get a Zombie Apocalypse Makeover

In the wake of a zombie apocalypse, things might get a whole lot more dead around here. If zombies started running the place – dead brains and all – you can imagine brands might need to start marketing there products a little, shall we say… unorthodoxly. That’s what designer/artist Ben Fellowes imagined: he’s reworked a whole line of popular logos, from Starbucks to FedEx, and made them a lot more gruesome just in time for Halloween day.

Car Logo Rip-Offs From China and Beyond

We’re all familiar with knock-off Nike shoes and Louis Vuitton handbags coming out of factories in China, India and beyond. Often, telling the real thing from the copy is a pretty difficult task without a side-by-side comparison… even down to the logos the original company pays massive advertising bills to burn into our minds. So that’s familiar, but what about on the large scale level of car companies?

What If Company Logos Were Honest?

What would happen if large corporations actually ran their companies with our best interests in mind? Their logos might look a bit more like these new editions in design wiz Viktor Hertz’s ongoing series: Honest Logos. Each design remixes the original, replacing their name with something more closely representing a stereotype behind what the company really brings to the world. The results are as refreshing as a grande caramel-mocha Frappuccino with whipped-cream and caramel drizzle… but a whole lot less fattening.