World Renowned Graphic Designer Recreates Famous Brand Logos Free Handed With Pen & Ink

With just ink and a calligrapher’s pen, Sebastian Lester can create lettering that looks computer generated. A graphic designer with clients that include NASA, Apple, Nike and The New York Times, he doesn’t even need a computer to create logos. In these short timelapse videos, Lester shows off his skills and perfect proportions as he free hand prints some of the most recognizable logos out there. Lester is one of the highest profile calligraphers in the world and he shares his talents regularly with his followers on Instagram.

Rob Draper Will Draw Beautiful Lettering on Anything, Even Food

Why yes, that is an Ikea hotdog with beautiful typography all over it. Designer and illustrator Rob Draper is the kind of guy who’s unafraid to push the boundaries a bit, even if it ‘knackers’ the nibs of his pens in the process. With plenty of shout-outs to ‘create more’ his meticulous work finds its way onto food items like loaves of sliced bread or the bottom of a bagel. Other pieces are on old discarded Costa coffee cups or the wrapper from eats at Wagamama (both giveaways of his UK-based location).

3D Calligraphy Jumps Off the Page

Turkish graphic designer Tolga Girgin has a passion for calligraphy, but her lettering has a look that’s all together different. Using an assortment of perspective trickery, she uses pens and pencils to give her old-school lettering a whole new angle – one that would have you believe each letter was pealing off the paper or hovering above it.

Playful 3D Typography Interacts With Reality And Pops Off The Page

From the sketchbook popping works of Hideyuki Nagai and Alessandro Diddi to 3D sidewalk chalk art by Kurt Wenner, we’ve always been impressed by anamorphic talents. But now we can combine that with our nerd love for typography with these playful works by Swiss artist Cyril Voilloz. The talented graphic designer, who splits his time between Berlin, Geneva, and Vancouver shows off his sketching skills with the most lively typography series we’ve ever seen. Letters pop from the pages and interact with the real world like a character from Sesame Street.

It’s Alive: Creepily Endearing Human Typography by Jean-Charles Debroize

This may be the creepiest, yet most amazing typography to date. Art director and digital retouching artist for Creative Agency Kerozen, Jean-Charles Debroize transformed members of his campaign team into letter people. Not the cute cuddly kind from Sesame Street, but rather deformed little creatures that might haunt your dreams, but there is something endearing about these weird little letters with skin, eyes, and hair.

1500 Days of Hand Lettering and Illustration From Chris Piascik

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In 2007, Chris Piascik challenged himself to make a drawing a day, and he hasn’t stopped yet. Amassing a significant body of work, Piascik just completed his 1,500th daily drawing earlier this month. His witty illustrations, well-executed patterns, and often irreverent hand-lettering pieces are bold in both coloring and statement.

The Art of Fried Eggs: An Awesomely Delicious Typography Project

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This amazing set of lettering by creative team Handmade Font combines two of my favorite things: typography and breakfast! The project involved “1,000 eggs, 10 pans, 5 burned fingers, 3 hours, 1 bottle of oil and a half of flat smelling like perfect and brand new Eggs font.” Based in Estonia, the team took high-resolution photos of sunny-side-up eggs in the shape of every letter and symbol you could ever want! Purchasing this set is so easy, it’s over-easy, but I guarantee when you check out their site you’ll have more than just Eggs type in your shopping basket.

Locks of Lettering: Human Hair Typography by Monique Goossens

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If you have long hair like me, hair balls in the shower drain and garbage can after cleaning out the brush are a common occurrence. In this clever series, designer Monique Goossens transforms those commonly overlooked hairballs into typography. She shapes the clumps of hair into letters and leaves stray hairs radiating off of each one so that its material is obvious. The Amsterdam based artist studied Interior Design and Styling at Academie Artemis and became interested in the relationship between photography and design, so she continued her studies at the Design Academy in Eindhoven.

Leading Ladies of Science: A Typographic Tribute

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To go along with his male-centric scientist minimalist typography series, Kapil Bhagat has added to it some of the most important females in science. With the popularity of his first set- Edison, Einstein, Copernicus, Galileo, Archimedes, Tesla, Darwin, and Pythagoras- he received requests for some of the leading ladies too, so on the anniversary of Marie Curie’s death he released this set. Honoring Marie Curie, Grace Hopper, Rosalind Franklin, Ada Lovelace, Barbara McClintock and Maria Mitchell, Bhagat creatively designs a way to show what each woman is famous for in her name.

Type in the Sky: Buildings Outline Cloudy Letters

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Many of us look to the sky for shapes and creatures in the clouds, but in a city you don’t always have the best view of the sky. Creative designer Lisa Rienermann saw cloudy blue letters as she looked up beyond the buildings and found a way to create the whole alphabet. Using the buildings as borders for each letter, she captured 26 remarkable photographic examples of what she calls Type in the Sky. She received an award for this series from the Type Directors Club New York, which exposed her work to Mercedes and Renault who later used it for their advertising campaigns.