This Interactive Music Video Gives You the Golden Touch

Sometimes it’s the simplest ideas that we love the most. Masashi Kawamura of creative lab PARTY (featured previously) teamed up with Logan director Kenji Yamashita to create a music video with a touch screen experience that’s charmingly retro… and by that, we mean touching the screen doesn’t do anything at all

Could You Live in an Internet Cafe? Japan’s “Cyber Homeless” Do

The cities in Japan can be challenging to live in. If you are not making a full-time salary, which typically involves long hours and high stress, then you are a temporary worker, which basically means you are on a short-term contract and making half as much as a “salary man.” With such low wages and rising rental costs, it’s tough to make rent.

Would You Wear It? Bacon Belts and Noodle Necklaces Made Like Japanese Food Samples

Walk into many Japanese eateries and you’ll see delicious food on display. It’s there to give you an idea of what’s on the menu, but don’t try to take a bite. The realistic food is completely fake. Food samples have been an iconic part of Japanese culinary culture for a long time, but now the artful creations are being turned into wearable jewelry and accessories. Would you wear it?

These Dioramas Look Real… Until the Artist Puts His Hand in the Shot

If you’ll humor me, I’d like to call these tiny dioramasminiature miniatures.” Japanese artist Satoshi Araki’s teeny tiny models are rich in detail, so much in fact, that they look like reality when captured under his careful lighting. But then he puts his finger in the shot and their true scale is revealed. Impressive.

Every Day for Four Years: This Artist Builds Quirky Dioramas from Household Items

Nobody would discount the difficulty of doing a 365 Project or the challenge of sticking to one theme for an entire year – but Japanese artist Tanaka Tatsuya has been doing his creative work every day for the past 4 years. That is impressive. He’s been using everyday objects from around the house – from broccoli and plastic water bottles, to loaves of bread and toilet paper – and transforming them into tiny dioramas that are large on humor.

Hidden Life: Tiny Surprises Captured Through a Macro Lens

Japanese photographer Miki Asai captures a world often hidden from the naked eye. Using her Canon EOS Kiss X5 camera with a Canon EF-S60mm F2.8 macro USM lens, she finds the simple beauty found in a raindrop, an ant or a snail. It all began when she was testing out her lens in the serenity of her own garden. She explained to 500px:

Chino Otsuka Travels Back to Her Childhood Through Superimposing Herself

At the age of 10, Chino Otsuka left her home country of Japan to move to the United Kingdom for school. When she arrived she was faced with the challenges that come with relocating to a foreign country. Adapting to new languages, cultures and environments while still navigating childhood were part of Otsukas journey now. It was this time in her life that inspired her to create a photo series she titled Imagine Finding Me.

Design Around the Lines: Barcodes Don’t Have to Be Boring

We love the idea of taking overlooked design elements and making them beautiful. The barcode is a good example of this. It’s on nearly everything we buy – from your latest iPad purchase to a Snickers bar at the market – just a bunch of lines and numbers with very little (if any) thought put in to how it looks. We’ve covered Steve Simpson’s remixes before, and now we’ve run across D-Barcode, a Japanese design firm that’s been steadily revamping this oft overlooked element.

Artist Cuts Exquisite Trees into Luxury Shopping Bags

If there’s one living thing NOT excited about the holiday season, it has to be the tree. Think of all the wrapping paper, newspaper ad sections and piles of shopping bags! Japanese artist Yuken Teruya has been transforming that last item into something that recalls its living source. With impressive precision he cuts a two-part silhouette – the lower branches and trunk, and the leafy top – into the side of each bag. Then he carefully folds them down into the space inside, joining the two shapes together and finally rooting the base of the trunk with a single drop of glue. Looking inside, viewers are treated to a magically idillic scene, softly lit through the holes above.

Check Out This Japanese Music Video Beautifully Animated on Spinning CDs

Life-Is-Music-by-Sour music video 1Life-Is-Music-by-Sour music video 3

Forget all the GIF animations you’re addicted to, and the conventional computer ones too. This wild new music video for the Japanese band SOUR’s single Life Is Music uses rotating CDs to bring a vintage style of animation to the modern day. A phenakistoscope was a nineteenth-century animation technique that used still images marked radially around a disk. When spun and viewed through a small slit, the image was visually prevented from blurring and created the illusion of movement. Designers Masashi Kawamura (of creative agency PARTY) and Kota Iguchi (of design studio Tymote) have updated the phenakistoscope technique, using animations precisely synched to both the shutter speed of their camera and the beat of the song.