A Kinetic Light Installation Dances on the Ceiling of St. Petersburg’s Leningrad Center

St. Petersburg’s historic Leningrad Center has a new and luminous ceiling for its main theater. Above the audience is a matrix of dancing multi-color LED lightbulbs hanging from nearly invisible cords that whisk them up and down in mesmerizing patterns. One moment the field of lights look like gently flowing waves and the next they form a geometric pyramid – each new form is made with smooth and precisely choreographed transitions.

The only problem here? People might be so captivated by the lights that they miss the show itself.

The World’s Largest Candy Carpet Is So Sweet

Forget Halloween, kids! Go to streets of Chengdu, China, to get your sugar fix from the world’s largest candy carpet. “Sweet as One,” a unique edible installation designed by Craig & Karl and curated by Hong Kong creative studio AllRightsReserved, featured more than 13 tons of candy arranged into a beautiful tapestry. Assembled meticulously by 2,000 volunteers over the course of five days, the colorful candy carpet measured 607 ft-by-23 ft (185mX7m) and weighed in at more than 13 tons.

The piece was created to raise awareness to underprivileged children in the rural areas of China and celebrate Chinese New Year in a unique way. Now that’s freaking sweet.

These Employees Are Having A Ball At Work

It’s all work and all play at the London creative agency Pearlfisher. In its forward-thinking installation called Jump In!, the agency filled its gallery space with over 81,000 white plastic balls to “promote the transformative power of play.”

Inspired by the Big Bang, This Installation Is Gorgeous Times Infinity

Japanese watch maker CITIZEN and Paris-based architecture firm DGT reimagine time pieces as art materials in their installation LIGHT is TIME. The duo suspended over 65,000 base plates–the foundation behind a standard watch face–to create a sparkling, golden galaxy.

Half-Solid, Half-Shadow: Moto Waganari 3D Prints Wireframe Sculptures

“I wanted to create something that never existed before. Something that will amaze us because it is not feasible by human hands,” says German artist Moto Waganari. From the realm of 3D printing a new genre of art is emerging, and Waganari’s work is a prime example. Creating wireframe-like sculptures of humans and animals, his final piece is both solid and intangible – designed to interact with light and create a partnering shadow.

MAD Campus: An Interactive and Eclectic Art Exhibit at the University of Washington

The University of Washington in Seattle is playing host to a series of interactive art installations this month, called “Mad Campus.” The event is sponsored by local art organization Mad Art, who makes it their mission to promote art to the public through innovative and surprising installations while supporting local and emerging artists.

Interview with Burning Man Artist Kirsten Berg

Kirsten Berg (featured previously) is one of the most well known yogis in the Ashtanga world, with people flying all over the globe to attend her classes in Thailand, Bali and the States, yet for 3 months of the year, she commits her time and energy to gifting amazing art installations at Burning Man. This year, her installation called (In)Visible was supported by the Burning Man organization and had a prominent location next to the Temple of Grace. The sculpture was a 20ft high column of faceted cubes that contained iridescent windows to reflect a variety of colors throughout the day and night.

We had the opportunity to talk with Kirsten Berg regarding her inspiration, lifestyle and future plans for her art.

This Cumulus Accumulates: Designers Create Cloud Made From Over 53,000 Pieces of Trash

New York-based architects and designers STUDIO KCA take trash to high places with their massive installation, Head in the Clouds. Assembled with 53,780 plastic jugs and bottles loosely strung together around an aluminum frame, Head in the Clouds creates a dreamy, billowing structure complete with an airy interior pavilion accommodating fifty people.

Coral Reefs Made From Household Supplies Make For One Deep Clean

Ordinary domestic supplies become fantastic coral reefs in the hands of artist Lynn Aldrich. Born in Texas and currently working in Los Angeles, Aldrich artfully arranges sponges, bottle brushes, mop heads, and plungers to mimic colorful deep sea terrain. The squashy neon qualities of household cleaning materials perfectly reflect the porous, wacky, and weird contours found underwater.

Could You Find Your Way Out Of A Glass Labyrinth?

Robert Morris’ Glass Labyrinth is no walk in the park. Commissioned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, the transparent installation honors the 25th anniversary of the museum’s permanent outdoor sculpture collection. Clearly, Glass Labyrinth is there to stay; measuring seven feet tall by 62 feet wide, the triangular behemoth weighs in at almost one million pounds and took a team of construction crew, engineers, and staff two months to install.