Anish Kapoor Creates an Ominous Whirlpool That Never Stops Draining

In the center of the old wooden floor of this former movie theater turned art space in San Gimignano, Italy, a dark pool of water spins in a perpetual whirlpool. Frothing like a raging sea, the unnerving sight drains into the floor and out of sight, lending viewers an uneasy feeling about what could be “down there.” The piece, called Decension, is the latest from British/Indian artist and designer Anish Kapoor, and follows on another in the series installed earlier this year at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India.

Sean Kenney Builds LEGO Sculptures Inspired by the Natural World

Sean Kenney has been using LEGOs for over a decade to make contemporary sculpture, and in the process he’s worked with millions of the tiny plastic bricks. His most recent work is featuring in his traveling exhibition Nature Connects, which includes 27 sculptures inspired by the web of life – from a small squirrel running along a fence, to a near-life sized bison that used 45,143 LEGO pieces and took 700 hours to complete.

Simple Paper Cylinders Form a Beautiful Sky-Gazing Experience

Sometimes the simplest of materials can create something of impressive beauty. For her graduating thesis project, Japanese art student Shoko Konishi created a structure made completely out of thick pieces of paper. From the outside it looks just fine, but climbing through the tiny door people are treated to an unusually spectacular view of the sky.

Slinkachu’s “Miniaturesque”: More Miniature People Take Over the Urban World

London-based artist Slinkachu (featured previously) has been hard at work creating some of the smallest street art we’ve seen. That’s not to demean its importance (though you might just miss it walking down the street). His tiny miniatures have been cleverly installed all over the city and parklands of London, creating humorous and surprising scenes of tiny figurines interacting with the larger world.

Reclaimed Wood Transformed into Immersive Geometric Installations

Using discarded housing materials as her medium, Australian-American artist Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels creates large-scale geometric installations that you can climb inside. Predominantly made from the wood lathe found in old plaster walls, her work plays with the uniform structures of a crystal, repeating layered triangles that link together into a human enveloping whole.

Large Origami Mirror Box Creates A Kaleidoscopic Experience

The best part of a fun house is always the funny mirrors. Seeing yourself stretched out or fattened up by the bend of a mirror is quite entertaining. Parisian artist Mattia Paco Rizzi has created an installation piece that rivals these fun mirrors, multiplying your image in a kaleidoscopic fashion. His interactive origami mirror piece, which he calls “Taumascopio” made an appearance at the 2014 Kanal Playground Festival in Brussels, Belgium. Aside from the view point at which you look at the piece, the temperature also changes the reflective effect, creating unique images throughout the day.

Carsten Höller’s “Upside Down Mushroom Room” Turns the World Upside Down

Carsten Höller creates immersive installations that change our view of the world on a massive scale. The Belgian-born, Stockholm-based artist flipped that view on its head, and enlarged its fascinating details for his Upside Down Mushroom Room. The disorienting space featured gigantic red mushroom sculptures hanging from the ceiling. It wasn’t the first or last time mushrooms made an appearance in his work, most recently finding their way to Frieze New York 2014.

Yes, That is a Frying Pan on the Beach. Sydney’s Coast Transforms into a Huge Sculpture Park

For a few weeks each year, the 2km coastal walk between Sydney Australia’s Bondi Beach and Tamarama Beach transforms into a gigantic public sculpture park. This year there were over 100 sculptures by artists from Australia and around the world. We kicked off our shoes and headed for the beach to capture some of the highlights from this year’s spectacular event.

Keep Off the Lawn: A Giant Climbs Out of the Ground in Budapest

A giant recently climbed out of the ground in front of Széchenyi Square in Budapest, Hungary… or so it appeared. The towering outdoor sculpture was part of a pop-up installation for Art Market Budapest, a contemporary art fair that happened earlier in October. The sculpture by artist Ervin Loránth Hervé was made from polystyrene and covered with turf patches to look like the grass was being ripped from the ground (hence the sculptures name, “Feltépve”, which means “Ripped Up”).

Grab Some Very Literal “Soft Drinks” At This Convenience Store

This east London corner store sells ordinary products, with one exception: they are all made of felt. For her “Felt Cornershop” installation, designer Lucy Sparrow recreated over 400 typical convenience store items–ranging from cookies to condoms–out of the familiar, kid-friendly fabric. She added logos and other details with brightly-colored puffy paint, then stocked her products at an abandoned market at 19 Wellington Row.