Home in on 4 Centuries of American House Architecture

America has had a long and storied history when it comes to where we call “home”. From the European inspired architecture of the 17th century, to 19th century Craftsman homes, or the “McMansions” of the ‘90s the continual evolution of American house design speaks to our roots and our vision for the future. Pop Chart Lab recently released a print on this theme, The Architecture of American Houses, which sorts over 4 centuries of architecture into 7 major categories (from Colonial to Neo-Eclectic), and 40 subdivisions. It’s fantastically rich on details.

Watch: How the 5 Major Religions Spread Across the World

The 5 largest religions today are Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam–but it wasn’t always that way. In this video, Alex Kuzoian at Business Insider walks us through 5000 years of history, showing how the world’s religions initially took root in small geographic areas in southern Asia and the Middle East. They didn’t remain localized for long.

Workers Find School Chalkboard Drawings, Hidden for 100 Years

When contractors removed old chalkboards at Emerson High School in Oklahoma City earlier this week, they had a surprise waiting for them: behind those chalkboards was another set which hadn’t been touched since 1917.

Like a time-capsule, the old boards reveal a slice of history from nearly 100 years ago, including artwork for Thanksgiving and history on the Pilgrims, an unusual circular multiplication table, a calendar, and a list titled “My Rules to Keep Clean”. The reason we share this story here: just look at that handwriting.

GeaCron: An Explorable Atlas of the World’s Past (Starting in 3000BC)

With the centennial of World War 1 upon us, it’s fascinating to look back at how different Europe was just 100 years ago. Then again, it was a lot different just 30 years ago too. GeoCron’s World History Atlas is an fascinating tool for peering back into the past and getting perspective on how different the world has been, even if the year you’re curious about is 2950BC. Although quite dated, the site makes it easy to travel anywhere from 3000BC up to the present day, watching the changes in civilizations as they rise and fall.

One Size Does NOT Fit All: How Tom Burrell Changed the World of Advertising

Before Tom Burrell, the advertising world was a very different place. But in the age of Mad Men, he was something different, too: an African-American man in advertising.

Surprising: The US is Only 4 Presidents Old

Viewed from the year 2015, the founding of the United States seems like a distant piece of history, but from the right perspective it wasn’t long ago at all. Take this little tidbit of information: the US is only as old as four President’s lives.

When Barak Obama was born (1961), Herbert Hoover was still alive (1874 – 1964). When Hoover was born, Andrew Johnson was still living (1808 – 1875). When Johnson was born John Adams was still alive (1735 – 1826). And there you have it. With just the overlapping lives of four presidents we reach the Founding Fathers of the United States. Pretty amazing.

Elevators in One World Trade Center Feature a Virtual Journey Through 500 Years of NYC’s Skyline

Riding the elevator to the top of the new One World Trade Center isn’t like any other ride – and that’s not just because it’s tall. Inside the five special elevators servicing the rooftop observation deck is a time-lapse video simulation that compresses 500 years of New York City’s skyline into the time it takes to reach the 102nd floor. The journey takes less than a minute and travels from swampy, tree covered Manhattan island, to the bustling skyscraper filled Big Apple we know today.

A Portrait of Albert Einstein Made From 2200 Dice

A couple years ago, Redditor Joshie196 created a computer program that allowed him to turn any image into a dice mosaic. Combining his project with Einstein’s famous quote, “As I have said so many times, God doesn’t play dice with the world,” he turned 2200 dice into the face of this great scientist. The finished product weighs nearly 25lbs. He plans on inscribing Einsteins’ quote on the bottom of the frame and is willing to sell the work if the price is right. It cost over $350 to make and shipping would not be cheap due to its heavy weight.

In 1939, Pontiac Built a Transparent Car from Plexiglas

For the 1939-1949 World’s Fair in New York, Pontiac had a special surprise in store. Working in collaboration with chemical company Rohm & Haas, who had just developed a new product called “Plexiglas”, they created an entire body shell for a 1939 Pontiac Deluxe Six. It was soon dubbed the “Ghost Car.”

What’s the Most Popular Girl’s Name? This Video Tracks Their Evolution from 1880 to 2013

From Anna, to Jennifer and Isabella, the popularity of different girl names is always in flux. But what’s in a name? As this bubble chart animation illustrates, there’s a lot of cultural significance to how we name our girls. It tracks the changing favor of different names in America from all the way back in 1880 up to 2013. And while one name may hold the top position for a decade or two, parents are always swaying between following tradition and choosing something different or modern – eventually even the most popular names fall from the spotlight.