A Growing Problem: Obesity is Still on the Rise in the US

In 2014, 27.7% of American adults were obese (BMI 30+), and that number is up 2.2% over the last 7 years. Meanwhile the number of people who are classified as overweight (BMI 25-29.9) has dropped by 1.5%, and people classified as normal bodyweight (BMI 18.1-24.9) has dropped slightly by 1%.

This points to a troubling trend – the population as a whole is getting heavier, with many people moving towards being overweight and obese.

Adolescent Obesity Has More Than Quadrupled in 3 Decades

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past three decades. In 1980, just 7% of children 6-11, and 5% of adolescents 12-19 were obese. Today those numbers have jumped to 18% and 21% respectively.

The CDC points out that these kids aren’t simply at risk from the long term effects of being overweight – there are a host of immediate health effects like a high risk factor for cardiovascular disease (with 70% of obese youth had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease), or a far higher chance of being pre-diabetic.

The preventative solutions the CDC puts forward are nothing new. Kids need more physical activity, and more healthy food.

This ‘Lucky’ Iron Fish Can Make You Stronger

It might not look like much, but this small iron fish can save lives. Canadian science graduate Dr. Christopher Charles traveled to Cambodia six years ago, where he discovered that anaemia was a huge public health problem.

Instead of finding children enjoying their youthful years, he found kids who were small and weak, often with slow mental development. Mother’s too were suffering. Tired and having painful headaches, many were unable to work. What these people needed was a healthy dose of iron in their diet – but the standard solution of daily iron tablets was often too expensive, too difficult to put into practice or simply unavailable. That’s when he had an idea.

Antibiotic Resistance is Growing, And So is Doctors’ Concern

The discovery of antibiotics in the early 20th century was a modern day miracle. Once common diseases like tuberculosis were nearly eradicated from the developed world in very short order, contributing hugely to the quality of life we enjoy today. But the wonder drugs are losing their power.

Who is Most Likely to Die of Alcohol Poisoning? Middle-Aged People

For many people, the term binge drinking conjures up visions of wild frat parties filled with poor youthful decisions. But if you look at what age group is most at risk from alcohol poisoning, the majority of deaths are actually happening to middle aged people between 45 and 54 – a staggering 34% of total alcohol poisoning deaths.

School Cafeteria Lunches Around the World

Each day in the United States, over 32 million students eat lunches from their school cafeterias. The food consumed accounts for more than half of each students daily calorie intake – which therefore makes the school cafeteria that much more important in delivering healthy food and preventing child obesity. Unfortunately, if you grew up going to an American school and eating food in the cafeteria, it is unlikely you got the most delicious and healthy food. Yet, if you grew up going to a school in another country around the world, you may have had a different experience.

3 Striking Charts Show How Vaccines Have Impacted 20th Century Diseases

Despite the few very loud voices still claiming vaccines are dangerous (and getting a lot of attention in the process), there is overwhelming evidence that they make the world a much safer place. Take the seven interactive heat maps created by Tynan DeBold and Dov Friedman for the Wall Street Journal. Each of the three examples we’ve featured here show the number of cases before and after a vaccine was introduced. Striking isn’t it?

A Donated Bus is Transformed Into a Mobile Healthy Food Market for Toronto

Most old-school food trucks are known for their artery clogging foods, but this new truck is decidedly healthy. The smart looking vehicle has been converted into a mobile market with the purpose of bringing healthy food choices to underserved neighborhoods where good eating choices are often difficult to obtain. It’s being called the Mobile Good Food Market.

A Two-Legged Chair Encourages Sitting People to Move (and Balance)

There is plenty of evidence that sitting down for long periods is bad for our health – and we’re doing a lot more of it. To combat this sedentary trend a number of solutions have been gaining traction, from exercises you can do in the office, to stand up desks and even hamster-like treadmills to keep us moving. But what about changing the way we sit? That’s what French designer Benoit Malta envisions with his unusual two-legged Inactivité chair.

Walk and Work in this Human-Sized Hamster Wheel

Study after study has shown that sitting down is killing us… but we still do it all the time at sedentary jobs with uncomfortable chairs. You’ve probably run across ‘treadmill desks’ at some point (no pun intended), but have you ever seen a human-sized hamster wheel? Instructables builders Robb Godshaw and wrdwise recently built a gigantic wooden one, and it’s large enough for a human AND their desk to fit inside. They launched their project with this spirited call to action (and production):

“Rise up, sedentary sentients, and unleash that untapped potential within by marching endlessly towards a brilliant future of focused work. Step forward into a world of infinite potential, bounded only by the smooth arcs of a wheel. Step forward into the Hamster Wheel Standing Desk that will usher in a new era of unprecedented productivity.”