What if Major Brand Logos Were Hand-Lettered?

For her graphic design graduate project, Sara Marshall imagined what the intersection between modern brand logos and the classic art of hand-lettering might look like – and it’s very thought-provoking. Like many of us Marshall has noted the trend toward flat, minimalist brand logos. With companies like Microsoft and Google leading the way, the iconography of major companies has lost some of its flair in the name of simplicity, adopting a minimal range of colors and making creative use of negative space.

While there are some good design arguments for going minimal, it doesn’t always have to be so.

Creative Catharsis: Posters of Strange Client Quotes

Despite the fact that many people do it for the creative aspects, design is often a customer service job. So, as with all work serving peoples needs, there are always clients with some unusual, if misguided requests. This collection of fun A3 posters was collectively made by Irish ad creatives, designers, animators, directors, and illustrators in their time off. The series, appropriately called A Creative Catharsis, transforms frustrating yet hilariously memorable client quotes into posters.

God Spotted On The Streets Of New York

null

Has anyone ever told you that God is all around you? Well… we have the photographs to prove it! He’s the guy that rode by on a motorcycle this morning and stole your wallet. He’s also the guy at the NYSE placing his bet amongst the other stockholders. Wait, didn’t I see God on The Price Is Right last night?

Ikea Hack: Decorate With Records

I’m not sure how many of us have a collection of vinyl records these days, but according to graphic designer Shane Keaney, they could be used as an inexpensive and attractive decorating idea. Calling his project Rekordit, Keaney is currently seeking support through Kickstarter, the website that helps get funding to creative projects by anyone with a new and innovative idea.

Expressions Of Love With A Nerdy Twist

Now here are some posters to warm the heart of any proud nerd! Nicole Martinez, an illustrator, art director and graphic designer from Boston says this of the inspiration behind the prints:

“My boyfriend and I came up with the phrase ‘nerdy dirty’ a while ago because we would say such nerdy things when we were trying to be romantic,” says Nicole. “So when I got the urge to design something sweet I could only think of things like ‘Aorta tell you how much I love you.’ Hence, the Nerdy Dirty poster series was born.”

Posters That Tell The Whole Story

These one-liner filled movie posters really bring back the silver-screen memories. Graphic designer and creative director Jerod Gibson, created the set using only a silhouette and famous words, yet the posters convey so much. No stranger to the design world, Gibson has worked with such notable clients as Urban Outfitters, New Scientist, Cartoon Network, Dirty Disco Kidz, F. Stokes, Alice, Gerber and General Mills. You can find him and more of his work on twitter.com or facebook.com and purchase his posters at society6.com.

Smart Illustrations Tickle The Mind

Design is so refreshing when it reveals its clever side and makes us think; and that’s just what artist/freelance designer Tang Yau Hoong’s illustrations do. By a creative use of negative space and a persistent re-imagining of objects, his work is entertaining as it is smart. Besides occasionally producing prints of his work Hoong has many snappy t-shirt versions of his designs printed through Threadless.

Iraq War Casualties: Pixelated

Kamel Makhloufi created this simple yet stunning visualization of Iraq war casualties using just pixels to represent deaths. Looking like the defragmentation of a hard-drive, the image is split between a representation of casualties by volume (left) and one showing casualties over time (right). Casualty types are broken down into four different colors: blue represents “friendly,” green denotes “hosts,” orange “civilians” and grey “enemies.” Based upon data released by Wikileaks as reported by the Guardian, the sobering reproduction of the data speaks volumes and patterns begin to reveal themselves.