Data + Design Project

As If Knitting With Yarn Weren’t Hard Enough, Carol Milne Knits With Glass

Thursday 10.16.2014 , Posted by
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I can’t think of cooler sculptures to give to a knitting aficionado, or anyone for that matter. Carol Milne does the unthinkable as she creates these fragile pieces that look like knitted glass. A long and complicated process that she created herself in 2006, Milne begins with a wax model, which is then surrounded by a refractory mold material (that can hold up in high temperatures). After the mold sets, she steams the wax out of the mold and replaces it with chunks of room temperature glass. The piece is then placed in a kiln and heated to 1400- 1600 degrees Fahrenheit, which melts the glass into the grooves formerly occupied by the wax. The glass is slowly cooled (can take weeks) to prevent cracking. When it is finished annealing, the mold is carefully picked away and voila! [Read more…]

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Slice Into These Incredible Glass Artworks

Tuesday 06.10.2014 , Posted by
Murrine Glass Artworks 1

The impressive artwork you see here employs an ancient 4000-year-old mideast glass technique called murrine. Using long rods of glass cane, intricate patterns can be built into a loaf like form, only revealing the hidden details when a slice is cut off. While you’ve probably seen the technique used in patterned glasswork at your local art gallery, you’ve never seen the astounding level of detail achieved in these reinterpreted paintings from Loren Stump. [Read more…]

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A Modernist iPhone Amplifier Crafted From Hand Blown Glass

Thursday 04.03.2014 , Posted by
2in1

We live in a strange age when ‘digital tech’ and the ‘local and handmade’ both have their own respective cultural movements. There’s a representative aesthetic and process common to each movement and  they very rarely cross paths. What makes this modernist design iPhone amplifier so unique is that each one is made individually of handblown glass – and we’ve got some amazing pictures to prove it! [Read more…]

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Don’t Lose Your Marbles: The Coolest Marbles You’ve Ever Seen

Saturday 02.22.2014 , Posted by
10 mike gong

Marbles have been around since ancient Roman and Egyptian times, but I assure you Cleopatra was not playing with anything this badass. Marble artist Mike Gong creates incredibly detailed handmade glass marbles and the series featured here is called “Acid Eaters”. Some of Gong’s marbles sell for over $1,000, but for avid marble collectors these are definitely worth the cost. [Read more…]

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Flip Teaching: Professor Builds a Crystal Clear Whiteboard So He Can Face Students

Friday 11.22.2013 , Posted by

Michael Peshkin

A professor of mechanical engineering at Northwestern University, Michael Peshkin loved using diagrams in his lessons, but hated turning his back to the class when he used the board to explain things, so he came up with a solution. He created a crystal clear whiteboard that he can stand behind to draw, while still facing his students. Using a large sheet of tempered glass with holes drilled through it, he used bolts to fasten a metal frame around it. He embedded strips of LED’s around the protruding rail on the frame to light up the inside of the glass, making the fluorescent dry erase marker ink stand out more. He also set up an extensive light system; he uses a monitor for digital overlays, watching the screen as he layers marker annotations over a diagram on the computer. See the crystal clear whiteboard in action after the jump. [Read more…]

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Explosive 3D Sculptures on Panes of Glass: Volcanic Smoke and A Nuclear Bomb Mushroom Cloud

Tuesday 09.03.2013 , Posted by

1 3D Nuclear Bomb by Eyal Eever

From head on, these gorgeous catastrophic explosions by Israeli artist Eyal Gever look like 3 dimensional sculptures, but looking at them from the side, their secret is revealed. Layering digital prints on two dimensional panes of glass, Gever is able to achieve a hyper-realistic image of the smoke given off of a volcanic eruption and the mushroom cloud of an exploding nuclear bomb. The pieces, appropriately titled Large Scale Smoke and Nuclear Bomb, began with a digital rendering of each explosion, which was fairly simple for Gever who is a visionary in the high-tech industry and actually designed the software he uses to create his 3d images himself. It’s hard to grasp the astonishment of these pieces with 2d images, but the videos below give a great representation of what they are like in person. [Read more…]

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Vibrant, Fractal Floor Installations at Museum Valkhof in the Netherlands

Friday 08.09.2013 , Posted by

1 suzan drummen

Like peering into a 3 dimensional kaleidoscope, Dutch artist Suzan Drummen has created gigantic, colorful floor decor. Using chromed metal, mirrors, crystals, and stones she cleverly arranged the shiny bits into stunning geometric arrangements. Like fractals, from afar the shapes look bold and beautiful, but upon looking more closely the intricate details can be seen. The installation is on display at Museum Valkhof in the Netherlands. Lustrous circles and spirals extend from the floor to the walls, creating a gorgeous rainbow of colors for visitors to interact with. [Read more…]

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Crystal-Beaded Pixelated Taxidermy Sculptures

Saturday 06.01.2013 , Posted by

1 Kohei Nawa deer

It’s always fascinating to think about how we are able to perceive the gazillion, bajillion molecules that make up our world and give names to the various objects and life forms in attempt to understand it all. Japanese sculptor, Kohei Nawa plays on this notion, switching up the viewer’s perception of objects by altering the surface. In this set, called PixCell, he covers the stuffed animals in crystal clear beads which magnify and distort different portions and give the appearance of molecular structure and computer screen pixelation. [Read more…]

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Graphic Shows How Google Glass Works

Wednesday 04.10.2013 , Posted by

google-glass-infographic header

By now you’re familiar with seeing fantastic videos filmed while people use Google Glass. From sharing sunset moments on top of skyscrapers to skydiving while streaming live video, the glasses-like device looks poised to revolutionize the way we both experience and interact with the world. But, among so many other questions about the system that we don’t know yet, how does Glass work? Although we’re treated to video based mockups of the clever looking UI seen on the tiny glass block the devices sport, there isn’t much mentioned about how you actually see the picture. Artist Martin Missfeldt recently pulled together documents on Glass’ design – including the patent itself – and has made a revealing infographic explaining how it focuses the picture on your eye. [Read more…]

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We Love Friday! – Stunning Blown Glass

Friday 03.01.2013 , Posted by

1-@treavorholdman

Long before people started making glass, it could be found in nature; when lightning struck sand or volcanic eruptions caused rock and sand to fuse together (obsidian). Humans first made glass around 2000BC, but the level of skill increased dramatically with the invention of the blowpipe in 30BC. Blowing glass has been popular since medieval times, and although the creations and techniques have gotten more interesting, the tools remain the same. According to Sea Life Creations, “The craft of glassblowing was passed from father to son, and from master to apprentice. From its beginnings, the formulas and procedures used in glassmaking were closely guarded. At times in history, the penalty for disclosing secret techniques was death!” Thankfully the tradition has been kept alive and there are amazing glass blowers all around the world. Here is a collection of some of the most interesting blown glass creations from Instagram. [Read more…]

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