Without 3D Printing, This Rocking Chair Would Be Impossible

You might be looking at the future of furniture. The Durotaxis Chair uses 3D printing to produce a unique structure impossible to create with traditional methods. The geometric structure of the chair uses complex math to create a lattice which scales in size, density, color and rigidity throughout its form.

Share:

Fancy Pancake Printer Makes The Future Look Tasty

I’ve never met a pancake I didn’t like. Ever since Mickey Mouse ear pancakes at Disney Land, pancake shapes have thoroughly impressed me. But I’ve never been able to pull off the pancake designs that Pancake artists like Nathan Shields can. In fact I’m lucky when my pancakes are even perfectly round. That’s why this new invention by Norway-based food enthusiast Miguel Valenzuela gets my heart pumping. This man created a pancake printer for his daughters and although it’s not for sale yet, the future is looking tastier already.

Share:

A Robot Searches for His Creator in This Beautiful and Desolate Film

In the sand dune covered lands outside his city, a robot searches for his creator. “We Were Not Made For This World,” is a beautiful and haunting film directed by Colin West McDonald and based on a story of the same name by award-winning cartoonist Paul Hornschemeier. This film is striking in its reliance upon a strong narrative, allowing the deep, soothing voice of Mark “Big Poppa” Stampley to carry the film to its conclusion. Beautifully done.

Share:

Projection-Based Interactive Jewelry Of The Future by Neclumi

Neclumi asks, “Are we willing to abandon atoms of gold for the waves of light?” A brilliant jewelry line created in the minds of Polish art collective panGenerator, Neclumi necklaces and watches will make the future brighter. Trading in heavy metals for a picoprojector, the interactive jewelry will be run through a custom app with 4 options for movement. Airo mode will react to a pedometer to move with you as you walk. Sono mode will react to the ambient sound and your voice. Roto will use the compass to react to the rotation of your body. Movi will react to your body movement to bounce with you.

Share:

12 Victorian Predictions for the Year 2000

One of the most interesting things about looking back at old predictions, is seeing how they turned out when the future date finally rolled around. As a whole, people are pretty bad at guessing what the future will look like (and especially if top hats will be in fashion), but common desires and dreams are still sometimes fulfilled in surprising ways. This set of German cards from around 1899 or 1900 are an excellent and entertaining example.

“Life in the Year 2000” was created by Hildebrands, a leading German chocolate company of the time. Certainly inspired by what the next century would hold, one card from the series was placed in each of their boxes of chocolate.

Share:

Harvard Students Create a Printable Self-Assembling Lamp

If you’re a child of the ‘80s, you might remember the Spielberg produced movie *Batteries Not Included. The imaginative film featured tiny, spaceship-like mechanical life-forms that could reproduce (and help rebuild decrepit apartment buildings). Now, it finally seems the age of self-assembling machines is upon us… or at least self-assembling lamps.

Share:

Is This the Future of Movie Posters?

What if every advertisement you saw jumped to life and let you interact? That’s certainly not a new idea – and plenty of malls now have large digital screens featuring moving ads – but could that also be the future of the movie poster? These animated examples of famous movie posters were created by an anonymous Imgur user, and capture the futuristic possibilities of cinema advertising while predicting possibilities for an exciting new industry standard.

Share:

Star Trek: Into Darkness- Movie Poster Remix

Adam Rabalais

After the great results of their World War Z movie poster competition earlier this year, Blurppy challenged artists once again, this time with a Star Trek: Into Darkness theme. Another great success was had as artists stepped up to the challenge and let their creative juices flow. If these designs were available to producers, it’s hard to say which poster we would be seeing on movie theater walls.

Share:

Graphic Shows How Google Glass Works

google-glass-infographic header

By now you’re familiar with seeing fantastic videos filmed while people use Google Glass. From sharing sunset moments on top of skyscrapers to skydiving while streaming live video, the glasses-like device looks poised to revolutionize the way we both experience and interact with the world. But, among so many other questions about the system that we don’t know yet, how does Glass work? Although we’re treated to video based mockups of the clever looking UI seen on the tiny glass block the devices sport, there isn’t much mentioned about how you actually see the picture. Artist Martin Missfeldt recently pulled together documents on Glass’ design – including the patent itself – and has made a revealing infographic explaining how it focuses the picture on your eye.

Share:

Vintage Predictions of Life on Other Planets

3 Frank R. Paul life-on-mars

In 1939, we knew much less about our solar system, so much less that these illustrations by Frank R. Paul may have really made people wonder about what strange life may be living on other planets. His drawings were some of the first images seen by science fiction writers Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, and Forrest J Ackerman, making him one of the greatest influences on the early pieces in the genre. Using what little knowledge scientists had about the compositions of each planet, Frank R. Paul drew his predictions of what humans might find should they try to inhabit the other planets.

Share: