Journey Through an Ever Evolving Fractal Forest

Juilius Horthuis takes us on a journey through a lush and evolving forest made of fractals. His video experiment, Where Forests Are… continues a series of exploratory work inspired by the natural world. Horthuis calls his poetic work “a fractal haiku.”

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Dom’Up: A Glamorous Treehouse That Doesn’t Harm the Tree

Most treehouses are rustic, but the new Dom’Up from architect Nicolas d’Ursel and arboriculturist Bruno de Grunne is downright glamorous. Their unusual design puts the treehouse in between the trees, combining the best qualities of the traditional treehouse with modern suspension systems like those on the Tentsile (previously). Because it requires no permanent mounting hardware, it is both quick to install and has no impact on the trees it occupies.

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Deep, Dark Forests Sculpted from Cardboard

Sculptor Eva Jospin makes art that completes a circle. She creates dense, dark forests out a material which they ultimately produce – sheets of cardboard. Cutting, layering and gluing the waste product into scenes with surprising depth, one could almost imagine taking a wander amongst their dark trunks, roots and leaves.

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Tiny Portraits Hidden in the Trees

While out for walks in the woods with their little son, Austrian/French artists Jana and Js have been painting the circles left by cut tree limbs. They provide the perfect cozy setting for their particularly friendly and introspective form of street art – one that emphasizes family, community and the human spirit. Does this off street work qualify them as “trail artists”?

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Smith Allen Studio Introduces 3D Printed Architecture to the World

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Since 3D printing technology has been introduced, we’ve seen it used for high heel shoes, skateboards, photo booths that make a miniature 3D figurine, and even 3D holograms of unborn babies. The possibilities for this line of machinery seem endless and Smith Allen Studio is taking things to an even larger scale with the world’s first 3D-printed architecture. The Oakland-based duo that comprises Smith Allen Studio is Bryan Allen and Stephanie Smith and their latest structure called Echoviren is made up of 3D-printed bricks. The white bio-plastic structure, which measures 10x10x8 feet, stands proud amidst a forest of Redwood Trees, and will safely decompose in 30-50 years.

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A Colorful Touch: Installations by Michael McGillis

A low curving stack of wood rises out of the grass, not drawing much attention from a distance. On closer inspection however, viewers are given an eye pleasing explosion of color – in the center of the stack is a precisely cut path which descends into the ground, the end of each log painted in brilliant purple.

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Sunrise Through the Mist: Beautiful Mornings in Poland

For anyone who wakes after the sunrise, you’ve missed it. Not so Polish photographer Boguslaw Strempel, he wakes well before the sun to capture some of the early morning delights – fantastic sun rays shining through the forest in his home country and in nearby Czech Republic.

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Visual Bits #292 > A View From Above

Check out your links after the jump.

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Monsters of the Forest: The Paintings of Andy Kehoe

Even though these paintings by Andy Kehoe feature a ton of otherworldly monsters, they still somehow have a very friendly feeling. Considering the gorgeous, magical forests they inhabit, maybe these are welcoming monsters, pondering the meaning of it all and seeking to make their world a better place. Find out for yourself and see plenty more paintings at andykehoe.net.

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Mirrored People in the Forest


Next time you find yourself walking in the forests of Scotland, look for mirrored people. Located on the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge, “Vestige” is an art installation created by Rob Mulholland. A contemporary sculptor and installation artist based in Scotland, he had originally intended for the six mirrored people (three women and three men) to be temporary. Hikers passing through the forest enjoyed the displays so much however, that it has now become a permanent art installation for all to enjoy.

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