4 Reasons Vertical Video is Suddenly OK

Despite our title for this post, most people would agree: vertical video is the bane of the smart phone era. Our eyes aren’t stacked on top of each other, making a portrait shaped image less than natural viewing. They don’t fit on standard TV or laptop screens, leaving huge black bars at the border. Heck, Google’s Android camera app even scolds you for trying to go vertical. And we can’t forget about the scourge of “vertical video syndrome”

A Growing Collection of Director Wes Anderson’s Bold Color Palettes

When it comes to making films, there are few who include more design elements than Wes Anderson. One of the most striking tools he uses is color. His craftily arranged scenes (which are mostly symmetrical) are infused with imaginative palettes we don’t see in most of today’s films. Like the Beyoncé palette inspiration we covered not long ago, this is a fantastic source of inspiration for any project.

If Famous Directors Designed Houses, Would They Look Like This?

Italian architect and illustrator Federico Babina has an obsession with imagining new buildings designed around unusual constraints. He’s dreamed up houses based on artists, movie sets, and the names of architects. Now he’s turned his design skills to dreaming up buildings as if they were designed by famous directors. His series, “Archidirector” features 27 directors – famous and obscure – each with a unique structure modeled after their signature aesthetic and personality.

Movie Déjà Vu: 3 Film Characters We’ve Seen Since the Beginning of Cinema

When I recently caught Jurassic World at the theater, there was something that really impressed me – and it happened before the main feature even rolled. Watching the trailers for upcoming films it was obvious: every single one was for a remake of a previously existing film, or a sequel to a another. Heck, even the movie I was seeing was a sequel (I guess I asked for it). What is going on in movies these days? Nothing new… but that’s not new either.

A Timeline of Underground Queer Cinema

The history of cinema is filled with life stories, but few that depict the LGBT community. In its century long existence, main stream cinema has typically shied away from the subject, deeming it too controversial or unpopular – but there were films being made. Fandor pulled together 50 films, both underground and mainstream, which paved the way for greater expression in queer cinema.

Western Films Are Brown and Dusty, Right? This Color Analysis Says We’re Wrong.

A little while ago Kevin Ferguson went on a western film viewing binge. When he was done he’d seen 50 of the classic cowboy movies, a whole lot of John Wayne and a lot of riding off into the sunset. His western obsession didn’t end there. Intrigued by the color in each film, he compressed its imagery into a single frame – an analysis of its form and light. Each of his ‘summed images’ reveal the color palette, mood and dominant framing technique that make a film’s running length.

Where Are the Most Popular NYC Filming Locations? This Map Has the Answer.

No matter how you slice it, New York City is one of the world’s most popular filming locations. From the top of the towering skyline, to the cab filled streets of Times Square, the city has featured in more than 517 films… and that’s just in the last 3 years. So where are the most popular areas to film? Metrocosm broke it down by visualizing all the film permit data from the “Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre, and Broadcasting” (every city should have one!), creating a street-centric heat map that quickly reveals some very hot filming locations (17,241 in 3 years to be exact).

The First and Last Frames of 55 Famous Films, Compared Side-by-Side

Out of the many shots in a film, the first and last are among the most considered. Filmmaker Jacob T. Swinney took 55 films and set those opening and closing shots side-by-side. In doing so, he reveals that many scenes are decidedly similar to one another, while others are absolutely different. What were the filmmakers trying to say with each of these beginnings and endings? Like the opening and closing of any story, each serves a purpose.

Is This the Most Amazing “Save The Date” Video Ever?

Some people call Tyler MacNiven the most interesting young man living in San Francisco. He has walked the length of Japan in search of the birthplace of his father, wrestled 100 worthy opponents in Mongolia, run across the country of Iran for peace, and even won the Amazing Race. Yet through all the adventures, the grandest of all might be his love for Kelly Hennigan, his bride to be.

Lessons from a Master of Cinema: How Akira Kurosawa Composed Movement

If you haven’t seen Tony Zhou’s excellent series Every Frame A Painting (previously), you are in for a treat. His videos dissect the work of filmmaking masters in a way that will have you appreciating (or loathing) most films you see afterward.