Lessons from a Master of Cinema: How Akira Kurosawa Composed Movement

If you haven’t seen Tony Zhou’s excellent series Every Frame A Painting (previously), you are in for a treat. His videos dissect the work of filmmaking masters in a way that will have you appreciating (or loathing) most films you see afterward.

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“Me & You”: A Love Story Told From Above the Bed

This new short film from London-based director Jack Tew has us looking down on a love story as it plays out in the bedroom. That’s where all the action happens anyway, right? The charming and realistic short was filmed entirely on a set, allowing for complete control of lighting. See the making-of video or head to meandyoufilm.com for more.

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Skaters Build a Railroad Riding Half-Pipe & Rowboat Ramp in the Latest Film From Zenga Bros.

You might recall the Zenga Bros. from their energy charged, nostalgia inducing film Ski Boys (and if you haven’t seen it yet, I’m envious). Now they’re back with a new short that’s equally enthralling. They worked with a load of skaters to create imaginatively artistic mobile skate ramps like you’ve never seen before. One is a railroad-traveling half-pipe with a conductors cabin on either end. Just roll it down the rails for a different view.

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A Wild Tour of Dubai, From Top to Bottom

Between its super-tall skyline, vast deserts, artificial palm-shaped islands, and its impressive wealth, Dubai is a place of extremes. It’s no surprise then, that award-winning filmmaker Rob Whitworth needed 3 months to explore, research and film the city and its surrounding lands for his latest video Dubai Flow Motion. It was time well spent.

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A 3.5-Minute Music Video Shot in Just 5 Seconds (Using a High Speed Camera)

French filmmaker Guillaume Panariello claims he’s made the “shortest shoot ever” and that might just be true. Using just 5 seconds of actual time, he’s created a 3.5-minute video which packs in a ton zany action – from a fishing eskimo and boozing cupid, to WWII soldiers shooting confetti.

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10 Must-See Movie Trailers for Films Showing at Sundance

The Sundance Film Festival just kicked off its annual frenzy of film watching in Park City, Utah. This will come as no surprise to the seasoned festival follower, but there are a load of ridiculously exciting films to catch. Looking for drama, documentaries, horror or sci-fi? There’s that and everything else too.

We’ve rounded up 10 must-see films from the fest. And if you aren’t joining the movie buffs shuffling through the frigid Utah weather, we’ve included trailers so you can have a sneak peak.

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Flying Over Southern New Zealand Feels Like a Beautiful Thrill Ride

Southern New Zealand is known for its exceedingly beautiful and rugged landscape, and this video from Australia-based director Mark Toia shows it from its best angle – above. The video captures a landscape pushed upward by the slow but powerful force of shifting tectonic plates. From those snowy mountain heights, water flows into perfectly translucent lakes, making its way downhill in a series of precipitous drops. It’s these stomach clenching heights that are captured over and over in this video, highlighting a collection of ‘aerial rushes’ produced as part of a TV commercial project.

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Movie Theaters Had Very Different Rules in 1912

You’ve seen it many times. You’re sitting there waiting for your movie to start, but first this message plays across the screen: “For the comfort of those around you, please silence your cell phone.” While you may think that this is simply an aspect of our modern era, it’s actually been a practice since the very start of film.

These fantastic movie theater etiquette slides from 1912 show many of the same rules as today (like keeping quiet and not standing up) and plenty that we wouldn’t even consider being a problem – like wearing really huge hats.

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The DreamBox Encourages Everyone to Follow Their Dreams and Be Inspired By The Aspirations Of Others

What is your greatest aspiration in life? This is the exact question that has been answered by thousands of people inside of the DreamBox. It’s a solar-powered video booth that records individuals speaking about their dreams with a green screen behind them. The participants leave their contact information so that when the dreams were released to the public as a webseries on the DreamMakers Network, the speakers were placed front of an inspiring background with contact info at the bottom of the screen, so that anyone interested in helping to turn the dream into a reality could get a hold of them.

A collaborative project between filmmaker Teddy Saunders, co-founder Paola Baldion, designer Brett Heyning of Toyshoppe Systems’, welder Kim Williams, special effects artist Thomas Bacho, and electronics designer, Jason Willis, the DreamBox made its debut on the playa at Burning Man 2012. Since then it has traveled to several other locations and now Teddy Saunders’, whose Oh! The Places You’ll Go At Burning Man video helped raise the attendance to 40% newbies the following year, has turned the collected dreams and what came of the project into a documentary.

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The Boxtrolls’ End Credits Shows How Much Work Goes Into Stop-Motion

A stop-motion movie might not be the typical platform for a philosophical discussion of determinism versus free will, but the end credits for The Boxtrolls handles it in very funny fashion. The short clip also highlights the massive amount of work that goes into creating a stop-motion film, showing a time-lapse animator repositioning each character a countless number of times to produce just this short sequence.

For an idea of how long this took, note the changes in the animators outfit as the days pass.

“It’s just too much…”

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