These 3 Trends are Killing Your Creativity

After nearly two decades working various jobs throughout the creative world, I’ve noticed a recent phenomenon in our industry’s culture. Creatives now are focusing more on insignificant things—like fashion trends and lifestyle accessories, while quality work is becoming the sideshow. Right-brainers have always done a knockout job of differentiating themselves from the rest of the pack, but I think these 3 distractions  may actually be hindering the creativity we for which we strive.

CONSTRVCT: Design Your Own Digitally Printed Fashion

There’s giving your customers what they want, and then there’s letting them do it themselves. CONSTRVCT is a forward thinking clothing company that recently built a 3D design tool to let just about anyone create custom clothing prints, even using their own imagery. It’s digitally printed fashion for the digital age.

A Hilarious Creative Project Turns Food Into the Faces of Famous Icons in Fashion

Using duct tape and walnuts, Donald “Drawbertson” Robertson, has created quite an interesting 40 page illustrated book. Working as a creative director for Estée Lauder, Robertson knows a thing or two about fashion. He chose 20 stars in the fashion sphere, drew them an interesting face on a nut and made them duct tape bodies, clothes, and accessories. He calls the collection Fashion is Nuts. The creations were photographed by Henry Leutwyle and the result is bizarre, yet awesome.

Fashionable Handbags Made from LEGO Bricks

Fashion and building with LEGOs doesn’t usually go hand-in-hand, but when it comes to these quirky handbags it certainly does. Agabag is a Polish company using the iconic plastic bricks to build some completely original bags – from chunky clutches, to purses and wallets. Just think how easy it would be to attach accessories…

Dresses Made from Crayola Crayons for Bloomingdales NYC

Crayons might be used for sketching dress ideas, but they’ve probably never been used to actually make dresses. Bloomingdale’s recently worked with six popular fashion designers who had created pieces for the 100% Bloomingdale’s Spring campaign. For this project however, they were given lots of Crayola crayons to create a fashionable statement for the window display at the iconic Bloomingdale’s store on 59th Street in Manhattan. In total, the designers used about 18,000 crayons to complete the work. Color us impressed!

This Guy Turns Grandma’s Afghan Crochet Blankets Into Funky Party Pants

We all have, or rather the lucky majority have, at least one grandmother or great aunt who showed her love by crocheting blankets for every occasion. If you were a child of the 70’s or 80’s then you’ve likely gotten cozy beneath one of these colorful yarn works of art, with your favorite movie was playing on your box TV through the VCR. But now you can bring back the nostalgia and take it with you everywhere you go with the fashionable stylings of Schuyler Ellers AKA Lord von Schmitt.

No-Frizz Flora and Fauna: Gorgeous Nature-Inspired Headdresses by Takaya

The models below are most certainly having a good hair day—with a little help from Japanese floral artist Takaya. Using fresh-cut blooms, berries, leaves, and even stuffed birds, Takaya crafts monumental wearable sculptures that are sure to turn heads.

Creepy Couture: A 3D Printed “Spider” Dress That Senses and Reacts to Motion

3D printing is being explored in many different ways, and Dutch artist Anouk Wipprecht isn’t afraid to use the technology to push the limits of fashion. Her latest creation is the “spider” dress, which is outfitted with six customized legs that spring out when it senses motion nearby.

Two Supermodels Pose Like Living Dolls for Vogue Paris

Just like the Barbie dolls at the toy store, supermodels Magdalena Frackowiak and Elisabeth Erm have been packaged like living dolls for the December/January 2015 issue of Vogue Paris. Italian photographer Giampaolo Sgura is behind the couture series, which sees the models enclosed in tall boxes with clear plastic windows, and surrounded by an array of fashionable accessories twist-tied to the walls.

Artist Imagines Eclectic and Humorous Food Hats

When artist and costume designer Maor Zabar was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease a few years back, he was forced to adjust his eating habits. Many of the delicious foods he was familiar with consuming were now off limits. So, to make up for the foods he couldn’t eat, he decided to make them wearable instead. Thus was born his special line of food inspired head wear: the Food Hat Collection.