Cute Little Pathogens: Colorful Microbe Embroidery By Alicia Watkins

Many artists have been inspired by the remarkable shapes of the microscopic world. Glass blower Luke Jerram sculpted beautiful maladies out of glass and now Alicia Watkins combines crafting with science with her colorful embroidery. Germs have never looked so cute as they do in these colorful cross-stitched patterns.

Capturing Travel Memories With A Camera Was Too Easy, So Teresa Lim Decided to Embroider Them Instead

With cameras that fit in our pockets, stored in a digital form that allows us to have hundreds of thousands at a time, sometimes taking a photo takes us out of the moment in our attempt to preserve it. Teresa Lim has found a way to combat this predicament. Now she spends two hours soaking in the energy of each travel spot while she embroiders what most would snap a quick shot of. In her series called “Sew Wanderlust” she brings us around the world with her and photographs each finished stitch work with the background that inspired it.

Delicate, Lace-Like Table Cloth Made With Thousands of Seeds

When looking at this intricate piece by Kansas-based artist Rena Detrixhe from afar you would think it’s a lovely example of vintage embroidery. But upon taking a closer look, you can see that the lacy design is not made from thread, but rather thousands of seeds. For this piece, which she calls Heirloom, Detrixhe gathered the seeds in Lawrence, Kansas, then spent countless hours meticulously stitching them into stunning patterns.

These Tiny, Adorable, Embroidered Animals Are Done Freehand

Imagine spending 2-3 weeks to create something not much larger than a sewing thimble. That’s often how long it takes Oxford-based artist Chloe Giordano to design, plan, and embroider each of her tiny animals. With multiple shades of each thread color as well as using 2 different types of thread- embroidery and sewing- she achieves a depth and texture that give a realistic feel to each creature. The already adorable and peaceful forest animals look even cuter in this teeny tiny size.

Embroidered Leaves Put Geometry in Nature

When Hillary Fayle studied embroidery at the Manchester Metropolitan University, she loved creating intricate patterns in small environmentally friendly materials. It only made sense when she returned to her home in the US to begin working with the many leaves of her local forest. Her miniature creations are immaculately studies in organic/geometric stitchery.

Metallic Stitching: Artist Embroiders Metal Objects

This ain’t your grandma’s embroidery. Lithuanian artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė decorates metal objects like buckets, lampshades, spoons and car doors, with floral and decorative patterns found in embroidery magazines. While the imagery is mostly traditional, the location is far from ordinary and creates a strange juxtaposition that is as surprising as it is refreshing.

92 Year Old Grandma Creates Simply Stunning Embroidered Temari Balls

Traditionally created from the remnants of tattered or old kimonos, temari (Japanese for hand ball) are a traditional toy and art form. When the tradition began, the kimono fabric would be wadded up in the shape of a ball and covered with strips of fabric, wrapped so tightly that it would bounce. Over time, it became a craft and the stitching become more intricate and artistic. The centers were replaced with rubber once it was brought to Japan and the art form became a competitive craft among women in the Japanese upper class. Here are some beautiful examples of temari created by a 92 year old grandmother, Nana Akua and photographed by her granddaughter.

Faded Memories: Diane Meyer Pixelates Family Portraits with Meticulous Embroidery

Diane Meyer time spent that might otherwise be forgotten pixel embroidery header

Last week I mentioned artist Johan Rosenmunthe’s pixelated photographs exploring the fuzzy nature of self-representation online – well, here’s an artist that is showing the equally fuzzy nature of memory. Los Angeles-based artist Diane Meyer has been using old family photographs showing her childhood in rural New Jersey, and meticulously embroidering them with chunky pixel-like cross stitch that both enhances and obscures the images of the past.

Entomology Embroidered? Miniature Insect Sculptures

Claire Moynihan Bug Balls 5

Although they often get a bad rap, the diverse and varied world of insects is a fascinating and beautiful one. UK-based artist Claire Moynihan certainly thinks so. She’s been creating entomological collections in traditional boxes using “freestyle” 3D embroidery techniques inspired by the stumpwork style. It’s a loose form of embroidery which allows her to experiment with different threads and materials to achieve her aims. Even considering her unusual creative mediums, her work would easily fool someone from a distance – and many people will be happy to know, we haven’t spotted any spiders lurking in the collections.

Brightly Embroidered Newspaper Pictures

Lauren DiCioccio 1

As more and more reading is done digitally and the printed newspaper gets closer to becoming obsolete, one artist attempts to immortalize it. Lauren DiCioccio mummifies the Front Page by covering it with cotton muslin and using a needle and brightly colored thread to re-produce the photo beneath. The text fades beneath the muslin sheath and the pictures remain to capture a moment in history in a physical way that can’t be felt digitally. She views newspapers with nostalgia as they were once a daily ritual enjoyed by most of the adult population, so with embroidery she preserves that tactile sensation without the smudged fingerprints.