A Portrait of Albert Einstein Made From 2200 Dice

A couple years ago, Redditor Joshie196 created a computer program that allowed him to turn any image into a dice mosaic. Combining his project with Einstein’s famous quote, “As I have said so many times, God doesn’t play dice with the world,” he turned 2200 dice into the face of this great scientist. The finished product weighs nearly 25lbs. He plans on inscribing Einsteins’ quote on the bottom of the frame and is willing to sell the work if the price is right. It cost over $350 to make and shipping would not be cheap due to its heavy weight.

Tumblr Treasures- Manuscripts from Historical Icons

As we move further and further away from the need for a pen and paper, with cell phones capable of handling our daily checklists, emails more common than writing a letter, and the ease of editing the drafts of a paper on a computer, hand-written manuscripts are becoming a thing of the past. This week’s Tumblr Treasure is a historical trip to the times when you could recognize a friend by his handwriting. F*** Yeah Manuscripts is a Tumblr compilation of manuscripts and other hand-written treasures from some of the greatest authors and occasional historical figures of all time. After you’ve scrolled through our tiny collection, be sure to show them some Tumblr love by clicking on the link above and check out the Visual News Tumblr while you’re at it!

A Tale of Two Twins: An Exploration of Relativity


Two twin brothers, not drawn completely alike, help us understand Einstein’s famous Twin Paradox. One twin takes off at near light speed for the dark depths of space, the other a creature of comfort, stays home to drink tea. Tracing their diverging lives this clever animation by Yuanjian Luo explores the often misunderstood logic behind such concepts as time dilation and nonequivalent reference frames… it’s an amusing, understandable and heart warming ride.

The Surreal & Iconic Portraits of Philippe Halsman


Before the age of Photoshop, there was Philippe Halsman. His dynamic and imaginative photography broke the rules of the day by going against the soft focus style of the time and giving sharp focus to his subjects. He used both stage and darkroom techniques to produce gravity defying objects and invented new ways of interacting with subjects. His works often appeared on the cover of Life Magazine. He worked with celebrities as varied as Salvador Dali, Richard Nixon, and The Duke and Dutchess of Wales.