This Visualization Will Help You Understand the Unbelievable Number of People Lost in WWII

The Fallen of World War II is a documentary visualization that gives us a heartrending perspective of the casualties lost during the conflict. Created by filmmaker Neil Halloran, the 18-minute short breaks down the war’s tragedies, stacking them into a sobering tally of the people who lost their lives.

With numbers reaching into the tens of millions, it is difficult to comprehend the magnitude of the war, or how it compares to the conflicts of today. But with Halloran’s exceptional comparisons and storytelling, the magnitude of World War II is made clear.

The Fantasy Coffins of Ghana

When you go, why not go out with style? In Ghana, you can take your pick of customized coffins for when your fateful day comes. The elaborately designed coffins, called Abebuu adekai, are made by specialized carpenters. There are a myriad of fantastical selections to choose from, including space shuttles, Nike shoes, cell phones, and handguns. These may seem a bit funny to Westerners, but in Ghana many of the selections for these coffins are symbolic of a form of wealth, power, comfort, or passage.

Who is Most Likely to Die of Alcohol Poisoning? Middle-Aged People

For many people, the term binge drinking conjures up visions of wild frat parties filled with poor youthful decisions. But if you look at what age group is most at risk from alcohol poisoning, the majority of deaths are actually happening to middle aged people between 45 and 54 – a staggering 34% of total alcohol poisoning deaths.

Hand Crafted Heavenly Beads Allow You to Carry A Piece of Your Loved Ones With You After They Have Passed

Losing a loved one is never easy. We hold their memory in our hearts but with the passing of time, sometimes we forget their warm smile or encouraging words. It’s hard to find the right words to say when someone has lost someone they hold dear, but with these beautiful glass beads, you can give them a gift that says everything you can’t. Glass artist Merry Coor turns a 1/2 tsp of cremated ashes into a symbol of eternal life and infinity. Like a planet or the cosmos, the ashes become a beautiful swirl in a glass bead that you can wear around your neck.

Organic ‘Burial Pods’ Allow Those Who Die to Grow into Trees

The art of being remembered comes in various forms depending on cultural norms and values. Some decide to cremate their loved ones and scatter the ashes, some create a headstone or mausoleum, and some plant flowers around a burial ground. ‘Capsula Mundi’ is a concept for those who would like to be remembered in a life-giving way. Described as a ‘burial pod,’ the deceased would be enclosed in a biodegradable egg-shaped pod which then uses the person’s body as nutrients to feed new life – sprouting a tree in its place.

Touching Self-portraits Document the Psychological Journey of Grieving Death

After losing her fiancé in a helicopter crash in 2012, Sarah Treanor quit her job as a graphic designer to pursue a deeply emotional exploration of grief through photography. The creative endeavor is symbolic of her psychological experience in process and in imagery, and captures the essence of the dark, peaceful, and disorienting journey of mourning. The heart-wrenching feeling the images evoke is universally familiar and carefully dissects the most difficult aspect of the human experience – death.

Moving Without Mom: Father and Daughter Recreate Wedding Photos of Late Mother

Ben Nunery and his wife Ali were married in 2009, just after closing the deal on their new house. Since the house was still empty, they took the opportunity to have their beautiful wedding photographs taken inside their new home. It was were they would celebrate the beginning of their new family, and the challenge of loss.

Tragically, Ali was later diagnosed with a rare form of lung cancer and passed away at the age of 31 in 2011. This year, Ben with his young daughter Olivia moved out of the house, and in a touching tribute recreated the special photos from Ben and Ali’s wedding day – a fitting way to mark new beginnings and remember happy times.

Amy Guidry Explores the Psychology of Life and Death

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The recent collection of paintings from Louisiana based artist Amy Guidry brings the surreal so certainly into existence it seems to easily step off the canvas into reality. Her work is filled with animal and human figures, often taking center stage in what appears as a bleak and beautiful southwest american landscape. This highly ambitious imagery – from detailed rock formations, to skeletons and variously dissected creatures – would be arresting on its own, but it also explores concepts more profound: the rich layers of connection in the cycle of life.

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Drone Attacks Interactive

Out of Sight Out of Mind - Pakastan Drone Attacks Interactive 2

The US has been waging war in the middle east for over 10 years now, making the combination of conflicts in the region the second longest war in our history. This is due, in part, to something new to our war making stategy: drone attacks. These non-manned flying machines allow the government to wage war without the risk of losing American military, while at the same time lowering the financial cost to wage such a conflict due to fewer deployed soldiers. Their are hidden costs to these tactics however, as this shockingly affective interactive graphic from Pitch Interactive makes abundantly clear.

Visualizing Major Causes of Death in the 20th Century

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I recently had the pleasure of attending a talk by the provocative philosopher John Gray as he discussed his new book – The Silence of Animals: On Progress and other Myths. During the engaging talk (which you can listen to here) he made a strong case for the idea that, while technology has progressed substantially over the last centuries, society and human behavior has not. Are we all just animals with mobile phones and machine guns? As we’ll see from this excellent graphic detailing the major causes of death in the 20th century, John Gray may be on to something.