Drone Captures Unique Birds Eye Views of Famous Landmarks

Everyone loves aerial photography, that’s why the airplane window shot is such a popular tradition on Instagram. But photojournalist Amos Chapple captures some views that an airplane passenger can’t. In his stunning series “Air”, the New Zealand-based artist used a drone to catch bird’s eye views of architectural landmarks. He was on the forefront of drone scouting before it was banned and captured quite a lovely collection of famous building from this unique perspective.

Makeup Artists Turn Eyelids Into Eyeballs To Make Humans Look Like Dolls

Women are contantly bombarded with altered images and given unrealistic toys in their younger years, that make them think that their eyes should be larger or their noses should be smaller. Some people go under the knife to achieve these impossible standards and turn themselves into a walking Barbie Doll and some do it less permanently with makeup. Photographer Laurie Simmons wanted to understand the “Doll Girls” community the best way she knows how- through the lens of her camera. In her latest series, “How We See”, Simmons captures models who have had their eyelids painted to look like big doll eyes. The images are quite creepy, much like the messages women are given that beauty is the most important thing to strive for.

Haitian Artists Help Photographer Create A Photographic Tarot Deck

In this beautiful, collaborative project, photographer Alice Smeets teams up with Haitian artist group Atis Rezistans to bring the tarot deck to life. The project, which they call The Ghetto Tarot involves re-creating the scenes of the Rider Waite Tarot deck in the slums of Haiti. Using trash and found items, the artists pose as a character in the tarot and Smeets captures the image against the vibrant backdrops of the region.

We Can Be Heroes: Martin Beck Reveals How Superheroes Are Just Like Us

You know that “Celebrities Are Just Like Us” section of the tabloids that shows celebrities in street clothes grocery shopping and walking their dogs without makeup on? Well if we lived in a comic book world where justice was served and the paparazzi followed the superheroes around, the tabloids might look like this photo series. Created by Martin Beck, a Scottish/South African photographer based in Dubai, “We Can Be Heroes” shows the aftermath of saving the world. The gritty portraits reveal the wear and tear that a lifetime of justice might take on a person. With bruises, dirt smudges, and unhealthy coping devices, these heroes are just like us.

How Do You Do Dinner? Photographer Takes A Peek Into The Dining Styles of New Yorkers

What’s your dinner style like? Do you have dinner at a table with family over laughter and conversation? Do you prefer solo style while catching up on your emails? Do you eat as a family with all eyes glued on a television screen? Japanese photographer Miho Aikawa answers all of these questions by simply photographing people having their typical dinner. In her series “Dinner in NYC”, she offers a glimpse into the private, or sometimes public in a restaurant or airplane or at the desk, eating habits of some selected New Yorkers.

Crazy Cat Lovers: An Inside Peek At The Homes Where Cats Outnumber People

For true cat lovers, one cat is never enough. And for French Canadian photographer Andréanne Lupien, neither are a few. In her Crazy Cat Lovers series, she takes a photo of a cat afficionado in his or her home, then digitally multiplies the cats in the most hilariously ridiculous ways. Cats take over the entire shot and the people appear to love their cat covered lives.

Elderly Toddlers Demonstrate That You Are As Young As You Feel

There is nothing cuter than a sweet old lady or man, except babies. This photo series combines the best of both worlds for some cuteness overload. For a New York Times article called “What if Age Is Nothing but Mind-Set?” about several behavioral psychology studies on aging, photographer Zachary Scott dressed up toddlers as grandparents. We love seeing animals in human clothes, but babies in adult clothes may have raised the aw-factor. With makeup, prosthetics, and a fair amount of photo editing, Scott made charming predictions of what six little kids might look like in 60 years.

Judging America: Photographer Shows the Stark Contrast Between Prejudice and Reality

Prejudice is all around. Whether judging someone by how they look or how they carry themselves, it’s easy to leap to conclusions about who they are as people—whether consciously or subconsciously. These assumptions are challenged in a unique photo series by photographer and former U.S. Marine Joel Parés. In a diptic photo series, Parés created portraits of a diverse group of individuals, photographing them as both stereotypes and as their true selves, unique individuals who serve the world: a gun-slinging gangster is actually a scholarly Harvard graduate, an armed terrorist serves the people of NYC as a nurse. It’s a fantastic reminder of how powerful stereotypes are.

Where Superheroes Go to Center Themselves & Unwind

We all need time to get grounded and ponder the meaning of life once in awhile. Superheroes are no different. French photographer Benoit Lapray imagines what these places of solitude might look like for all of your favorite Marvel and DC comic book heroes. The imaginative series, which he calls “The Quest for the Absolute” features the superheroes deep in thought in beautiful natural settings. Wonder Woman wades in a tranquil lake while Superman prefers flying over crystal glacial waters.

Back to Light: Artist Turns Fruit Into Electrochemical Cells for this Fantastic Photo Series

Remember back to middle school science class when you got to create your own circuit with copper wire, a galvanized nail, and a potato? Well photographer Caleb Charland has put an artistic twist on that old trick by transforming fruit into electrochemical cells. Aside from the awesome illumination, he creatively arranges everything and the wires to create beautiful long exposure photographs. With this series, which Charland calls Back to Light, he hopes to illustrate and initiate conversations about the endless possibilities of alternative and sustainable energy production.