Michael Cho’s Superheroes are Super Retro

Two things that really flourished during the ‘50s: illustration and comic books. Toronto-based artist and illustrator Michael Cho has perfectly combine those two trends in deliciously retro fashion, creating handmade fan art the old fashioned way. Featuring your favorite heroes of yesteryear – from Superman and Thor, to Batman and Ironman – his work is exceedingly positive and makes you feel that all is right in the world… and if it isn’t, he’ll show us who to turn to.

Superheroes: Their Past and Present in One Image

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They are now the characters of myth and legend, their stories so woven into our collective psyche that their histories seem more fact than fiction. Batman, Wolverine, Spiderman, they inspire us with their struggles, overcoming young lives unlike any other, and showing us the heroic way to deal with them. San Francisco-based graphic designer Khoa Ho is creating fantastic images in his Past/Present series, showing us these figures as their young selves being initiated into superhero status, and as they appear now, fully clothed in their disguise of choice.

Comic or Movie? It’s a Superhero Media Crossover!

“Just how thin is the line that separates movies from comics?” asks Butcher Billy, a graphic artist, illustrator and web designer from Brazil. Have we really come that far, or are our modern films just rehashing classic themes… or as he puts it, exchanging “ink” for “pixels?” As we can see from his new series, The Superhero Media Crossover Project, despite the massive advances in technology and a complete change in format, much of our new movies owe a serious debt to the comic artists of the past.

The Eclectic Art of Barry McGee is Back!

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The Bay Area is the place to be in late August for Barry McGee’s 2012 exhibit. If you haven’t heard of Barry McGee and you are interested in urban art you definitely want to look him up. I’m excited to announce that the California’s Berkley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive have been awarded a $100,000 grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation to hold an exhibit for Barry McGee showing over two decades worth of his work.