4 Reasons Vertical Video is Suddenly OK

Despite our title for this post, most people would agree: vertical video is the bane of the smart phone era. Our eyes aren’t stacked on top of each other, making a portrait shaped image less than natural viewing. They don’t fit on standard TV or laptop screens, leaving huge black bars at the border. Heck, Google’s Android camera app even scolds you for trying to go vertical. And we can’t forget about the scourge of “vertical video syndrome”

If Famous Directors Designed Houses, Would They Look Like This?

Italian architect and illustrator Federico Babina has an obsession with imagining new buildings designed around unusual constraints. He’s dreamed up houses based on artists, movie sets, and the names of architects. Now he’s turned his design skills to dreaming up buildings as if they were designed by famous directors. His series, “Archidirector” features 27 directors – famous and obscure – each with a unique structure modeled after their signature aesthetic and personality.

Movie Déjà Vu: 3 Film Characters We’ve Seen Since the Beginning of Cinema

When I recently caught Jurassic World at the theater, there was something that really impressed me – and it happened before the main feature even rolled. Watching the trailers for upcoming films it was obvious: every single one was for a remake of a previously existing film, or a sequel to a another. Heck, even the movie I was seeing was a sequel (I guess I asked for it). What is going on in movies these days? Nothing new… but that’s not new either.

Western Films Are Brown and Dusty, Right? This Color Analysis Says We’re Wrong.

A little while ago Kevin Ferguson went on a western film viewing binge. When he was done he’d seen 50 of the classic cowboy movies, a whole lot of John Wayne and a lot of riding off into the sunset. His western obsession didn’t end there. Intrigued by the color in each film, he compressed its imagery into a single frame – an analysis of its form and light. Each of his ‘summed images’ reveal the color palette, mood and dominant framing technique that make a film’s running length.

The Ghost in the Machine: Famous Celebrities Made from Old Film and Tape

Erika Simmons is revealing the Ghost in the Machine – that’s the apt title for her unusually creative artwork which uses the relics of the 20th century – namely film reels, music and VHS cassettes – to create portraits of the person the tape may have featured. She unwinds the magnetic tape inside and, carefully cutting and twirling it, arranges it into incredibly perfect portraits.

Are UK Comedies Smarter Than Hollywood? Edgar Wright’s Masterful Use of Visual Comedy

If you’ve seen movies like “Shaun of the Dead” or “The World’s End”, you already know the work of Edgar Wright… and you also know he’s a master of visual comedy. His films use elements forgotten by much of the comedy genre, not to mention mainstream filmmakers as a whole. Good thing for us Tony Zhou has created a hilarious, and thought provoking critique of Wright’s sight-gags and British visual comedy as a whole, while pointing out the general laziness found in many Hollywood comedies.

Is This the Future of Movie Posters?

What if every advertisement you saw jumped to life and let you interact? That’s certainly not a new idea – and plenty of malls now have large digital screens featuring moving ads – but could that also be the future of the movie poster? These animated examples of famous movie posters were created by an anonymous Imgur user, and capture the futuristic possibilities of cinema advertising while predicting possibilities for an exciting new industry standard.

The Many Faces of Bill Murray: How Many Do You Know?

As far as actors go, you won’t find many more universally loved than Bill Murray. Whether he’s hilariously trying to blow up gophers in Caddyshack or wowing us with subtlety in Lost in Translation, his appearances are almost always memorable – even if they’re just momentary cameos. Now Steve Murray (no relation) has created an fantastic visual compilation for the National Post, capturing The Many Faces of Bill Murray over the years. It starts with The Rutles in 1978, finishes with his recent appearance in The Grand Budapest Hotel, and misses very few acts in between (only two early bits of voice work). Can you remember them all?

Centered: This Supercut Gets to the Heart of Wes Anderson’s Symmetrical Film Styling

If you’ve ever seen a Wes Anderson film, there’s no doubt you’ve noticed his highly stylized version of film making. From quirky characters and theatrical set design, to a heavy use of graphic design and… everything being centered. That’s what a filmmaker who goes by Kogonada noticed, and then made this fantastic supercut of Wes Anderson moments with a dotted line showing their incredible, addictive, immaculate: symmetry.

Casablanca Isn’t the Same on Your Smart Phone. Franck Bohbot Photographs Classic Cinemas from the Golden Age

In today’s world, watching movies is as easy as streaming or downloading practically any film to your phone or computer. When it’s free, why not… right? With all this modern tech it’s easy to forget that back in the first half of the 20th century going to the cinema was quite the glamorous affair. You got dressed up and attended the same way as one would go to the theater or the symphony. There were intermissions and libations to enhance the overall experience along with music from a wurlitzer before and after the movie. It was an unforgettable moment in cinema history and some of the most beautiful theaters were built during this period.