Poignant Photos of Twins Over 50

There’s a proverb in China that says the fifties are the years one comes to understand their fate. This proverb inspired Beijing-based photographer Gao Rongguo to pursue a project he titled “Identical Twins.” It involved photographing pairs of twins as if they are looking at each other and document their differences. The results are poignant and carry a solemnity appropriate of contemplating one’s existence.

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Sculptures Created with the Help of Bees

Chinese artist Ren Ri is creating sculptures in collaboration with bees. He’s given up control of the final creative process, using chance and the bee’s innate industriousness to create a series of pieces based on the wax cells of the honeycomb.

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These Clothing Sculptures Let You Take the City With You

There’s packing for a trip, and then there’s this. Popping out of soft shell luggage we see towering city blocks, skyscrapers and bridges in a rainbow of colors. It’s as if someone packed up the city and brought it along. The works are part of Chinese artist Yin Xiuzhen’s series Portable City, and fittingly, each piece is made from second-hand clothing.

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Hua Tunan’s Splashing New Work!

Hua Tunan has emerged significantly since we first covered his explosive paintings a year and half ago. The Foshan based artist has recently released new work through the Edge Creative Collective, and it might be even more eye catching than before.

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You’ll Never Believe That These Are Ballpoint Pen Drawings

Based in Shanghai,China, Wang 2mu (二木 王) is pretty handy with a ballpoint pen. The illustrator works mostly with blue and red ink to create intricately detailed designs that look as though they could be digital. His themes revolve around technology, childhood nostalgia, and domestic culture. The level of saturation and three dimensionality that he achieves with simple ballpoint pens is unbelievable.

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Chineasy: A Building Block Way to Learn Chinese

The Chinese language is filled with a vast number of complex characters, and is thus known for being one of the most difficult languages in the world to learn. China is a growing country, both in population and commerce. It won’t be long before people around the world will find a need to speak Chinese, as tech innovation makes the distance between the East and West smaller. Understanding the difficult task of learning Chinese, London-based Chinese language teacher Shao Lan created Chineasy — a website and system that allows people to read and learn Chinese easier by recognizing characters through simple illustrations and videos. 

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Pitch Your Tent! An International Camping Festival in China Promotes a Green Ethos

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If you’re curious if people from mainland China do any camping, here is a festival that shows just how the the Chinese engage in the outdoors. In this most populated and vast country, Chinese citizens don’t always find the time for such leisure – as their work ethic and earnings often take priority over other activities. Although, with an increasing youthful, adventurous population, and rising disposable incomes, recreational activities such as snowboarding, camping and hiking are becoming more popular in the mainland.

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East Meets West: Zhu Jinshi’s ‘Boat’ Installation

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It’s a huge structure, but it weighs only a small fraction of most things its size. That’s because the floating tube featured here is built out of 8,000 sheets of rice paper, 800 shafts of bamboo, and cotton. Chinese abstract artist Zhu Jinshi installed the 12-meter long hanging structure, called Boat, last month at Art13 London, a new international art fair where the highly experiential piece featured as the centerpiece for the show.

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Eclectic Mosaics by Chinese Artist Hong Hao

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Hong Hao is considered one of China’s most famous contemporary artists today. Born in 1965, Hong Hao received his formal arts education from the Central Academy of Fine Arts, where he earned a degree in printmaking in 1989. A professional artist since 1978, Hao makes his home in Beijing, China. This month he will be exhibiting a selection of his extensive work at the Pace Gallery in Beijing from March 16-April 27.

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Landfill Photography: Classic Chinese Landscape Style

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Once filled with nothing but beautiful, natural, mountainous, tree-filled landscapes, the now over-populated China has some views that aren’t quite so serene: landfills. To contrast the idyllic past with the realistic present, Chinese artist Yao Lu photographed the landfills, covered in green netting, then digitally manipulated the photos to look like the familiar vintage landscapes in traditional paintings. He adds mist, trees, and buildings to the heaps of rubbish, making them appear beautiful and serene until you look closely enough to realize that they are not actually mountains.

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