Movie Theaters Had Very Different Rules in 1912

You’ve seen it many times. You’re sitting there waiting for your movie to start, but first this message plays across the screen: “For the comfort of those around you, please silence your cell phone.” While you may think that this is simply an aspect of our modern era, it’s actually been a practice since the very start of film.

These fantastic movie theater etiquette slides from 1912 show many of the same rules as today (like keeping quiet and not standing up) and plenty that we wouldn’t even consider being a problem – like wearing really huge hats.

Nothin’ But Lines: The Digital Designs of Patrick Seymour

With white lines on a black background, Patrick Seymour knows how to make an image pop. His creations appear to be 3D as he varies the thickness, curve, and direction of each line to achieve an astounding level of depth. From all corners of the animal kingdom to pop culture heroes and villains, each image features a perfect line of symmetry, further adding to the page popping contrast of the white on black. Seymour is based in Montreal, Canada where he works as the art director for PALM + HAVAS.

The Most Dapper Animals You’ve Ever Seen

You don’t have to be rich or even human to have good style. Just look at these classy animals in vintage gentleman’s wear. These classy pieces are the work of LA-based artist Alexander Houlton. He combines Photoshop with woodworking with the goal of “making people smile uncontrollably.” For this series “Animals in an Animal World” Houlton used Photoshop to replace human heads from vintage photos, which he found online in public domain libraries, with the heads of various animals. He then adhered each print onto wood, which he cut with a powered handheld jigsaw, and burned it with a torch to give it the vintage feel. He did an amazing job sizing the heads and matching them with the perfect outfit and pose.

An Artist’s Mission to Photograph 1,000 Bedrooms Around the World

A bedroom can tell a lot about a person’s character. Where we sleep and the area surrounding area often reflects our personal style and shows a glimpse at how our brains are organized, yet our bedrooms are intimate places that not many people will see. Photographer Margaret Ellen Burns from Sydney, Australia, gives us a peek into those secret worlds as she treads forward on her mission to photograph 1,000 bedrooms with their people in them. She takes the photographs on black and white 35mm film with an Asahi Pentax Spotmatic camera that used to be her mother’s.

A Slice of Time on A Crowded Subway Platform: Stunningly Clear High Speed Video

Somewhere along the border of still photography and motion picture lies the stunning high speed footage shot on Adam Magyar’s self-constructed slit screen camera with homemade software. Over a span of just seconds, on a busy NYC subway platform, there is so much going on and Magyar slows it down so that we can see how much our eyes miss. Hundreds of lives, all on a different path, converge for a moment on a single subway platform, likely never to line up in that same way again.

Not Your Typical Homeless Portraits: Beautiful, Upbeat & Dignified

Nobody dreams of being homeless when they grow up, but difficult times, foreclosures, and a continually declining job market have left some people without a roof over their heads. Whatever the struggle, it’s important to remember that these people are people and they don’t deserve the stereotypes that are commonly associated with the homeless. Photographer and long-time homeless shelter volunteer, Rosie Holtom seeks to show the beautiful souls shining through the faces of people in unfortunate situations, fighting to make a better life for themselves against all odds. She captured some of the strong individuals at Shelter from the Storm, London’s ONLY free homeless shelter, giving them dignity and hope. The portraits are black and white and show each person’s strength and value, and they look just like anyone else, reminding us to be grateful for what we have and understand that nobody is immune to tragic circumstances. Before thinking of someone as homeless, think of them as a person.

Portraits of Unrelated Doppelgangers Who Have Found Their Match

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Fascinated with the idea that two totally unrelated people can look like twins, photographer Francois Brunelle set out to take portraits of 200 doppelgangers. This beautiful black and white series began when he photographed a pair of friends who looked as though they were identical twins that had been separated at birth. Although most of his photos so far have been taken in North America, Brunelle is now taking his I’m Not a Look-Alike! project around the globe to create a book and international exhibit. He has already been looking for look-alikes in Australia!

Man Intimately Photographs his Beloved Wife’s Heroic Battle With Cancer

1 Jennifer Cancer stages by Angelo Merendino3 Jennifer Cancer stages by Angelo Merendino

It was love at first sight when photographer Angelo Merendino met Jennifer, who grew to love him as he grew the courage to tell her how he felt. Five months after their wedding, their world was shaken when Jennifer was diagnosed with breast cancer. Soon after their one year anniversary, after a double mastectomy, chemotherapy, radiation, and constructive surgery, the doctors declared Jen “cancer-free” and they began to put their lives back together. A few months later, they found out that the cancer had metastatised through her liver and bones. They realized that as much as their family and friends were concerned and wanted to help, they had no idea what the couple was going through, so they decided to document Jen’s battle with cancer through intimate photos. Merendino shows how true it is that a picture is worth a thousand words in this emotionally charged, powerful series.

Leanne Shapton Recreates Iconic Film Moments with Watercolor in “Sunday Night Movies”

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Sometimes learning the back story of a piece of art can be disappointing to the viewer, but Leanne Shapton’s explanation behind her new book “Sunday Night Movies” is completely satisfying.

“Sunday Night Movies” is a compilation of watercolor paintings Shapton created as part of a larger series “A Month of…” back in 2011. In a piece for the New Yorker, Shapton explained how the series only made sense to her really after she stepped back and viewed it after.