Trippy Body Painting Illusions from Natalie Fletcher

The world of body painting is full of illusions, but we haven’t seen any quite like these. Renowned body painter Natalie Fletcher isn’t painting clothing on bodies, or camouflaging them in the real world (although she’s an expert at both), this time she’s created fantastically trippy illusions that obscure the true human form.

Share:

Let the Light Shine Through: Ramon Todo Creates Stone with Glass Inserted in the Middle

Artist Ramon Todo makes strange sculptures which combine the strikingly different textures of stone and glass. His work, looking much like man-made geodes, uses materials from river rock, to volcanic stone, to graffiti covered pieces of the Berlin wall. His glass additions perfectly match the shape of his found stones, creating a surprising luminous transition where the light is able to shine through.

Share:

More Mind-Bending Photo Manipulations from Erik Johansson

The world is not as it seems in Erik Johansson’s mind-bending photograph manipulations (featured previously). Here is a world where mirrored ‘M.C. Escher stairways’ really exist, where land flows like water, and where small towns float on the sea in glass bottles. Each illustration is a detailed masterpiece to behold.

Share:

Deep, Dark Forests Sculpted from Cardboard

Sculptor Eva Jospin makes art that completes a circle. She creates dense, dark forests out a material which they ultimately produce – sheets of cardboard. Cutting, layering and gluing the waste product into scenes with surprising depth, one could almost imagine taking a wander amongst their dark trunks, roots and leaves.

Share:

Bizarre Sculptures Rotate The Face 360 Degrees

Italian artist Gianluca Traina creates bizarre sculptures with the form of the human head. The image of the face, however, is rotated far off center. Her series, entitled “Portrait 360” uses a combination of 2D and 3D work to realize sculpture that is difficult to clearly identify – but that’s just the point.

Share:

A Gigantic Sculpture Cast from the Trunk of a 140-Year-Old Hemlock Tree

Seattle-based artist John Grade has created a sculpture precisely shaped from the living trunk of a 140-year-old Western Hemlock tree growing in North Bend, Washington. Built from a latticework comprised of hundreds of thousands of salvaged old-growth cedar blocks, the story behind its construction (and ultimate fate) is almost as beautiful as its light-filled form.

Share:

Downright Creepy Ceramics from Israeli Artist Ronit Baranga

Some people get nervous about eating unusual foods, but it’s not often anyone gets creeped out by their dinnerware. Israeli ceramicist Ronit Baranga creates the kind of work which can elicit exactly that reaction. Her works feature open mouths and grasping fingers jutting out of classic plates, tea cups and platters. It’s enough to make anyone think twice.

Share:

Celebrity Portraits Painted with Emojis

Most people use a camera or a paint brush to make portraits, but not Yung Jake. This multi-talented artist uses something more often used to share enthusiastic and/or ambiguous emotions via text message. That’s right, emojis.

Share:

Circular Paper Cut Scenes from Nermin Er

Turkish artist Nermin Er cuts circular silhouettes into flat sheets of paper, layering each spherical scene into cinematografic worlds with beautiful depth. Many of her works see the land wrap around the sky, forming a bright focal point that centers on the sun or moon above. How appropriate then, that many are built as light boxes which gently illuminate each sheet of paper.

Share:

5500 Light Bulbs: An Interactive Sculpture Lets You Change The Phases of the Moon

The last time we covered artists Caitlind R.C. Brown and Wayne Garrett, they were encouraging people to control the weather with their interactive installation called CLOUD. This time they’re letting you take control of something even more difficult to grasp: the phases of the moon.

Built from 5500 burned out light bulbs donated by the community, the duo installed ‘New Moon’ in Lexington, Kentucky, last February. On the wooden platform beneath the four arches supporting the orb was an ornate turnstyle. When intrigued passerby gave it a spin, they changed the phases of the moon above. Surprising and delightful.

Share: