Charming Animated Illustrations from Japanese Artist Maori Sakai

Japanese illustrator Maori Sakai has been drawing charming scenes of those special moments in everyday life, then animating them with a lively happiness that’s simply infectious. Many of her drawings have positive messages that flash through their moving scenes and remind us to focus on the simple and good things in life. “Happiness is by your side” or “Take it easy”.

HULA Paints in Abondoned Places from the Side of His Paddleboard

Hawaiian artist and surfer Sean Yoro (aka HULA) has been living in New York. What to do when there are no waves around? He’s been grabbing his paddleboard and using it to access hard to reach places and paint. Yoro has a talent for painting beautiful women, and recently they have been finding their way to the walls of abandoned, water filled places. Their bodies seem to emerge from the quiet waters below.

Star Wars Portraits Made from 10,000s of Staples

Artist James Haggerty creates mosaics from a very unconventional material: LOTS of staples. His only tools in the process are a regular office stapler and the all important staple puller to correct mistakes. His work transforms the ubiquitous office supply into fine artworks with striking accuracy and realistic shading. For his most recent portraits he’s created works featuring 3 characters from the first Star Wars trilogy: C-3PO, Greedo and two versions of Darth Vader.

Pneumàtic: Tire Sculptures Seem to Dissolve Into the Sidewalk

Artists Octavi Serra, Iago Buceta, and Mateu Targa have collaborated on a series of sculptures featuring salvaged car tires that seem to disappear into walls and sidewalks. The trio of artists have made works that play with our mind and our understanding that tires are hugely tough. It makes it almost impossible to comprehend that these aren’t actually sinking into the concrete or brickwork on the streets they inhabit.

In fact, to create each piece, the artists used grinding tools to slice the tire, then placed it back in its natural urban environment to amuse.

HOT TEA Invites You to Swim Surrounded by Fields of Color

Minnesota-based street artist HOT TEA has a thing for rainbows. When we last covered his work, he’d yarn bombed the walkway on New York’s Williamsburg Bridge. Now he’s been tasked with bringing new life to the swimming pool on Roosevelt Island, but instead of using his normal yarn, he’s (thankfully) transformed the space with incredibly bright gradients of paint. 120 gallons to be exact.

A Gigantic 3D-Printed Zoetrope Based on Ruben’s Gruesome Painting, ‘Massacre of the Innocents’

British artist Mat Collishaw (previously) has built a huge 3D-printed zeotrope called All Things Fall. The highly detailed circular sculpture is populated by 350 different figures, environmental elements and architectural pieces which animate when the carousel is spun in front of a synchronised strobe light. In motion, a shockingly grisly scene is revealed.

Jim Bachor Fills the World’s Potholes with Very Sweet Mosaics

We’ve seen attention brought to potholes by filing them with surprises like an ice bucket of beer or a wild Barbie pool party – but what about actually fixing the problem? Chicago artist Jim Bachor has been doing that in a highly unusual and clever way, filling the tire-popping road craters with beautiful and surprising mosaics made from glass and marble. See? Create art, save the world (or at least a few tires).

This Picasso Just Became the Most Expensive Painting Ever Sold

The most expensive painting in the world is no longer Francis Bacon’s Three Studies of Lucian Freud, which Christie’s sold for $142.4 million in 2013. An anonymous buyer has just paid an astounding $179.36 million for Pablo Picasso’s 1955 painting Les femmes d’Alger (Version “O”), putting it in top position in the world of very expensive artworks. The painting last sold in 1997 for a paltry $31.9 million.

You’ve Seen Body Painting Before. But Has It Moved?

The distinctive chameleon is known for its ability to change colors, but the lizard featured here is even more changeable than that – this one can become human.

Bodypainting legend Johannes Stötter (previously) has created an incredible moving illusion, using two dextrous models laying atop each other to create the form of a chameleon. Then, in coordinated movements, they slowly walk along a branch – or so it seems.

Get Ready for the First 3D Printed Short Film

French artist Gilles-Alexandre Deschaud is about to make history by debuting the first short film made completely with 3D-printed pieces. The film “Chase Me” uses nearly 2500 individual pieces to create the story of a young ukulele carrying girl on a walk through the mysterious forest. While others have created 3D printed animations, this will be the first that could be called a short film.