Fanciful Nature-Filled Pop-Up Art From Bozka

Polish artist and illustrator Bozena Rydlewska, aka Bozka, creates fanciful scenes inspired by the diverse flora and fauna of the natural world. Long a maker of ornate prints, she is now translating her 2D work into delightfully explorable 3D pop-ups. Although her works pays tribute to the nature illustrators of old, her’s is a world that doesn’t play strictly by the rules.

This Man Shaved Off Half His Beard, Then Replaced it With All Kinds of Things

São Paolo-based photographer Adrian Alarcon spent 4-months growing a magnificent red beard – and then he shaved it off half of it. That’s a strange look, but it got stranger. His witty project saw him replacing the missing facial hair with random objects from around the house – from colored pencil shavings and chocolate sprinkles, to toy soldiers and thumbtacks. He calls his series “Fifty Fifty Selfie Barber Shop.”

Scott Blake Makes Incredible Flipbooks (Some with Just a Hole Punch)

Remix artist Scott Blake has been creating some seriously fantastic flipbooks, and some are made with only a hole punch. The tiny dots move in surprising harmony, following geometric arcs as they seem to move about the page.

Other flipbooks feature famous events (like OJ Simpson running from the law) or everyday scenes like burning matches.

This Artist is Giving Plastic Bottles a New Life as Plant Sculptures

Using discarded plastic PET bottles, Czech artist Veronika Richterová creates fantastic translucent plant sculptures. Whether its an entire shelf of cactus’ or lillypads floating in a pond, each is a whimsical take on the natural world – one that protects it from being over-run with waste products.

Dots of Paint Transform Ordinary Stones into Beautiful Mandalas

Australian artist Elspeth McLean loves color and detail, infusing it into all her works, large and small. Using a painting style inspired by ancient and traditional art, one she describes as “Dotillism,” she uses acrylic paint and a paintbrush to create intricate patterns of intense colors. Here we bring you some of her smallest works – round ocean stones transformed into beautiful handfuls of art. She calls them ‘Mandala Stones.’

Pressed Ferns Transform into Intricate Animal Illustrations

Artist and illustrator Helen Ahpornsiri uses pieces of nature to illustrate the natural world. Her intricate collages use pressed ferns to create butterflies, sea horses, beetles and other wild creatures. Her home in the East Sussex countryside provides much of the inspiration.

Surprising New Paste Ups Interact with the Street

Street artist/street modifier OakOak (previously) has been hard at work over the past year, transforming the streets into playgrounds for characters large and small. The French artist is a specialist in street interventions, using derelict objects like bent pipes, cracked pavement and nightly shadows as inspiration for his surprising brand of art.

Charles Leval Makes Art That Interacts With the Streets of Paris

French street artist Charles Leval (aka Levalet) is pasting up Paris with highly original artwork that interacts with the street itself. With his talented eye, a metal grate turns into an umbrella, a advertising box becomes an x-ray machine, and a sculptural Minotaur’s head grows a body (doing a maze of course).

Bizarre and Beautiful Architecture Collages Feature Parts from Many Buildings

Take a series of old world buildings, chop up their best bits, and rearrange them with an eye for the surreal and fantastic. That’s the basic recipe behind German graphic artist Matthias Jung’s bizarre collages of fictional architecture. Sitting in a peaceful, pastoral world, each unusual structure strikes a surprising contrast to the natural beauty that surrounds.

Portraits of Musicians on Old Vinyl Records, by Daniel Edlen

On the very records that hold their music, artist Daniel Edlen creates pitch perfect portraits of famous musicians. Similar to old velvet paintings, he adds the highlights to the dark surface of the vinyl, using only white acrylic paint and a rough-edged brush to dab the likenesses of greats like John Coltrane and Aretha Franklin. Each record is mounted on top of its original cover, with the round paper center peaking through to reveal the name of the artist.