Data + Design Project

Santa Claus Invades 24 Classic Paintings

Monday 12.16.2013 , Posted by
Ed Wheeler Santa Classics 7

That jolly old elf Santa Claus is up to some art history shattering shenanigans this christmas. With some assistance from his little helper, photographer Ed Wheeler, Santa has found himself riding Napoleon’s horse across the alps, crossing the Delaware river, decorating one of Mondrian’s paintings with a wreath and even becoming God. [Read more…]

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How Creatives Work: The Ever Playful Alexander Calder

Thursday 12.05.2013 , Posted by

American-Sculptor-Alexander-Calder-photographerd-by-Hungarian-Photographer-Andre-Kertes-in-Paris-France-1929

Alexander Calder made play the major theme of his art. Over the course of more than fifty years, he worked harder than most in the pursuit of the creation of his own universe, invented a whole new genre, an art of moving sculpture known as ‘mobiles,’ and made works on an unsurpassed scale. But he was also an incredibly interesting character, a man who had a childlike view of life which translated seamlessly into his work. [Read more…]

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What Would History Look Like as Told Through Instagram?

Monday 11.25.2013 , Posted by

Histagrams 1

“If something isn’t on the internet, it didn’t happen.” At least that’s what a lot of people seem to think in our modern age, when every birthday party, natural disaster or new creative pursuit has to show up on Facebook or Instagram. But what if the major historical events of the past happened today with our current social media obsession? What if DaVinci had posted instagram teasers showing his nearly completed Mona Lisa? What if someone posted a photo of the Trojan horse before its secret contents were revealed? That’s what MTV designers Gusto NYC and Gavin Alaoen set out to do on their hilarious new blog, Histagrams. [Read more…]

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How Creatives Work: The Emotional Performance Art of Marina Abramović

Friday 10.25.2013 , Posted by

marina-abramovic-artist-present-moma (1)

It is 2010 and a woman sits in the atrium of The Museum of Modern Art. She wears a white robe and across from her sits someone else, a museum patron, or more generally a human being. The woman sits motionless, staring straight into the face of the person facing her, not looking away or breaking eye contact for any reason. When the patron in front of her feels like they have had the experience they wanted, they get up and walk away. The woman looks down with eyes shut, preparing herself for the next person. [Read more…]

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Vintage Instructions: Hand Shadows Create Animals

Thursday 09.06.2012 , Posted by

It’s hard to say when making figures using the shadows of our hands started, but it probably originated on the walls of caves lit by the dancing flames of an ancient fire. Through the ages the art progressed to include animals, people and characters of all sorts, culminating in the late 19th century when French entertainer Félicien Trewey popularized the technique by making the silhouettes of famous figures. [Read more…]

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Modern Movies Go Ancient East

Thursday 07.12.2012 , Posted by

Coming to an ancient Turkish theater near you: Star Wars! As part of his graduation thesis, Murat Palta created this exceptionally entertaining series of movie themed illustrations based on motifs from the Ottoman Empire. His eastern take on western cinema is as interesting to look at as it is hilarious… it’s such a unique take on traditional cinema. [Read more…]

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The Bridge to Utopia: die Brücke’s Wild Expressionism

Monday 06.04.2012 , Posted by

One of the most organized expressionist groups was “die Brücke” (the bridge), which was established in 1905 in Dresden by 4 young artists – Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Erich Heckel, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff and Max Pechstein. The groups name was most likely inspired by the work of F. Nietzche’s (1844-1900) “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” (1882) in which he describes humanity as a bridge, a transition to a higher ideal. As the Brücke members themselves wrote in a letter in which they invited Emile Nolde to join: “One of the main purposes of our group is to gather all the revolutionary and restless elements, as our name suggests”. [Read more…]

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