Matthieu Bourel Slices Up the Past in His Surreal Photo Collages

Berlin-based artist Matthieu Bourel slices up the past to create these fantastically surreal images. Famous faces like Gregory Peck and Yul Brynner multiply into forms which are both person and sculpture, disturbing and beautiful.

Bourel says he likes “to evoke a fake history or inspire nostalgia for a period in time that never truly existed.”

Waltz on the Walls: Oakland’s City Hall Transforms into a Magical Aerial Stage

Taking to the walls of Oakland’s City Hall in California, dancers Amelia Rudolph and Roel Seeber suspended from windows above to put on a fantastic aerial waltz. The two Bandaloop dancers performed the graceful act during the Art + Soul Festival and filmed the first person experience using GoPro cameras mounted to their body. Simply magical.

300,000 Photos of Riots, Wildfires, and Paintings in Abandoned Houses to Create this Monumental Time-Lapse

This short film is truly monumental. Film-maker Jeff Frost spent two years capturing 300,000 photos of street riots, wildfires and abandoned houses in the desert to create a time-lapse that goes way beyond anything we’ve seen. Many of his scenes look too surreal to come straight from the camera’s lens, but with the help of paint and on location lighting, he’s created the piece without any post-production graphics or digital effects. Simply fantastic.

What Happened When ’40s Cartoonists Drew Their Famous Characters While Blindfolded?

What happened in 1947 when Life Magazine asked comic strip artists to draw their famous characters while blindfolded? From the looks of the second illustration in each pairing below, some incredibly mixed results.

This Satirical Facebook Art Is Pure Genius

Facebook. It’s a name that has come to represent many different things, and Polish artist/cartoonist Pawel Kuczynski has hit on most of them in his satirical series featuring the site’s iconic lower-case “f”. Far from hopping on the usual “invasion of privacy” bandwagon, Pawel explores the positive sides of the social media site too – from how convenient it makes connecting with people, to its use as a tool for social justice. In each of his images the blue “f” is present, acting as an integral character in the story Pawel is telling.

Paintings for Ants: One Tiny Painting Every Day for One Year

If you’re looking at these images on a computer screen, they’re far larger than life. Lorraine Loots has a phenomenal talent for creating paintings so small they’re dwarfed by the tools used to make them. The Cape Town-based artist created these pieces as part of a long running 365-day project, making one new illustration per day in her series “Paintings for Ants”.

4 Lessons From the Life of Orson Welles

Orson Welles has a varied reputation depending on who you ask. He lived many lives. Some cite his egotism and success as a Broadway theater director during the Depression. Others mention his War of the Worlds broadcast which, according to legend, scared the living daylights out of the American people and convinced many that they were truly being attacked by aliens. Some cite his genius directorship of the ‘greatest movie ever made,’ Citizen Kane. Finally, others mention his uneven and difficult later years; his battles with studios, his ads for California wine and weight gain, and his lack of finished projects.

Artist Reaches Out and Touches His Hyperrealistic Paintings

Venezuelan artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez paints people so realistically it looks like he can reach out and touch them. In fact, he’s been posting pictures that look just like that. His recent hyperrealistic paintings are an exploration of people in water – swimming, floating, exploding from the surface – with each tiny droplet rendered so believably you would think the canvas was wet. In his whimsical progress shots, Nuñez reaches out, seemingly holding his subjects in place as he puts on the finishing touches. Be sure to check out his fantastic work on Instagram and Facebook.

Florentijn Hofman’s Gigantic Lounging Bunny Meets a Fiery End

You’ve definitely seen the work of Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman before. He’s the creator of the world’s largest rubber duck that’s been slowly floating to harbors around the world. Now he’s created a bunny sculpture that is no less gigantic. Called “Moon Rabbit” the sculpture was part of the Taoyuan Land Arts Festival located at Dayuan Town Naval Base in Taiwan. The piece was made as a homage to East Asian folklore, which talks of a rabbit that lives on the moon (you’ve seen that before right?). Here the bunny gazes up at the sky, perhaps dreaming of getting back home.

A Wooden Wave Made from 9076 Individual Parts

HG-Architecture of Seoul Korea, have created a wave-like wooden structure that is a mix of striking complexity and sinuous simplicity. Looking something like a clever stack of rectangular Jenga blocks, the piece is based on the idea that everything in nature is made from individual components. Atoms and molecules make up complex structures like waves… and people too.