Charles Leval Makes Art That Interacts With the Streets of Paris

French street artist Charles Leval (aka Levalet) is pasting up Paris with highly original artwork that interacts with the street itself. With his talented eye, a metal grate turns into an umbrella, a advertising box becomes an x-ray machine, and a sculptural Minotaur’s head grows a body (doing a maze of course).

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Bizarre and Beautiful Architecture Collages Feature Parts from Many Buildings

Take a series of old world buildings, chop up their best bits, and rearrange them with an eye for the surreal and fantastic. That’s the basic recipe behind German graphic artist Matthias Jung’s bizarre collages of fictional architecture. Sitting in a peaceful, pastoral world, each unusual structure strikes a surprising contrast to the natural beauty that surrounds.

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Portraits of Musicians on Old Vinyl Records, by Daniel Edlen

On the very records that hold their music, artist Daniel Edlen creates pitch perfect portraits of famous musicians. Similar to old velvet paintings, he adds the highlights to the dark surface of the vinyl, using only white acrylic paint and a rough-edged brush to dab the likenesses of greats like John Coltrane and Aretha Franklin. Each record is mounted on top of its original cover, with the round paper center peaking through to reveal the name of the artist.

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Wooden Wireframe Sculptures Recreate Everyday Objects

Most household items wouldn’t be considered beautiful, but when Polish artist Janusz Grünspek creates sculptures featuring many of them, they become something bigger than their everyday roots. His real-life wireframes take the form of cassette tapes, a coffee maker or an Apple laptop, all made with delicate precision with just wooden skewers and a hot glue gun. Wood isn’t something you usually associate with 3D modeling, but in this case it does the job wonderfully. His series is called “Drawings in Space” (Zeichnungen im Raum).

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Sean Kenney Builds LEGO Sculptures Inspired by the Natural World

Sean Kenney has been using LEGOs for over a decade to make contemporary sculpture, and in the process he’s worked with millions of the tiny plastic bricks. His most recent work is featuring in his traveling exhibition Nature Connects, which includes 27 sculptures inspired by the web of life – from a small squirrel running along a fence, to a near-life sized bison that used 45,143 LEGO pieces and took 700 hours to complete.

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Dreams You Can Almost Touch. Paintings by Finnish Artist Samuli Heimonen

Finnish artist Samuli Heimonen creates surreal paintings which explore humanity’s big questions, using metaphor, and his love for animals and nature as a way to tell the story. His dreamlike imagery is highly atmospheric, yet is still able to communicate deep human emotions with near physical impact. Like any dream, the line between reality and illusion is remarkably thin.

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Rob Draper Will Draw Beautiful Lettering on Anything, Even Food

Why yes, that is an Ikea hotdog with beautiful typography all over it. Designer and illustrator Rob Draper is the kind of guy who’s unafraid to push the boundaries a bit, even if it ‘knackers’ the nibs of his pens in the process. With plenty of shout-outs to ‘create more’ his meticulous work finds its way onto food items like loaves of sliced bread or the bottom of a bagel. Other pieces are on old discarded Costa coffee cups or the wrapper from eats at Wagamama (both giveaways of his UK-based location).

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It’s Not Photoshop. These are Iconic Photographs Recreated as Miniature Models

When they aren’t creating high quality advertising photographs, Switzerland-based Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger have been building impeccably detailed models of iconic photographs. Viewed from the same angle as the original photograph, you would almost swear these were Photoshopped. Like so many good (and crazy) ideas, this one began with a bit of fun

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Hypnotic Geometry: Kinetic Sculptures by Jennifer Townley

Jennifer Townley’s sculptures would look impressive even if they were sitting still – but, each one moves. Her kinetic sculptures are driven by simple electric motors, and through a series of belts, cogs and shafts, they move in ways which are hypnotically complex.

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Wrap Yourself in Nature: Virginia Lee’s Enchanting Illustrations

English artist Virginia Lee imagines a world filled with the surreal and fantastical. Her illustrations often feature magical landscapes so welcoming the inhabitants can wrap the earth around themselves like a warm blanket. If you’ve ever been enchanted by the quiet woods on a long walk, you know how the world can envelop you in this way.

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