3 Artists Who Harnessed Inner Turmoil in the Pursuit of Creativity

Creating art is not an easy thing. As I talked about in my review of Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art, it can be a struggle, a battle even. Pressfield’s book was about overcoming the difficulty of getting down to work, of stopping procrastination and doing the thing you have to do. But there is another kind of creative struggle that many go through – the struggle with one’s self, with one’s inner demons.

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Trippy Body Painting Illusions from Natalie Fletcher

The world of body painting is full of illusions, but we haven’t seen any quite like these. Renowned body painter Natalie Fletcher isn’t painting clothing on bodies, or camouflaging them in the real world (although she’s an expert at both), this time she’s created fantastically trippy illusions that obscure the true human form.

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Dresses Made from Crayola Crayons for Bloomingdales NYC

Crayons might be used for sketching dress ideas, but they’ve probably never been used to actually make dresses. Bloomingdale’s recently worked with six popular fashion designers who had created pieces for the 100% Bloomingdale’s Spring campaign. For this project however, they were given lots of Crayola crayons to create a fashionable statement for the window display at the iconic Bloomingdale’s store on 59th Street in Manhattan. In total, the designers used about 18,000 crayons to complete the work. Color us impressed!

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Let the Light Shine Through: Ramon Todo Creates Stone with Glass Inserted in the Middle

Artist Ramon Todo makes strange sculptures which combine the strikingly different textures of stone and glass. His work, looking much like man-made geodes, uses materials from river rock, to volcanic stone, to graffiti covered pieces of the Berlin wall. His glass additions perfectly match the shape of his found stones, creating a surprising luminous transition where the light is able to shine through.

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James Dyson’s ‘Impossible’ Uphill Fountain

You probably know the name James Dyson because of his unusual cyclone vacuum cleaners or his seemingly impossible bladeless fans, but you probably didn’t know the famed industrial designer also built a fountain. For the Royal Horticultural Society’s Chelsea Flower Show way back in 2003, he created an M.C. Escher inspired fountain that looks like it convinced water to flow impossibly uphill. The reason we write about it here is because its trick is decidedly clever. How did he do it?

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More Mind-Bending Photo Manipulations from Erik Johansson

The world is not as it seems in Erik Johansson’s mind-bending photograph manipulations (featured previously). Here is a world where mirrored ‘M.C. Escher stairways’ really exist, where land flows like water, and where small towns float on the sea in glass bottles. Each illustration is a detailed masterpiece to behold.

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Frozen Sand Sculpted by Strong Winds on Lake Michigan

Last week, photographer Joshua Nowicki was visiting St. Joseph on the shores of Lake Michigan when he spotted something very odd. Spread out on the beach were hundreds of small towers of sand, each about a foot tall. The tiny formations were created by a combination of freezing temperatures and very high winds (sometimes gusting to around 50 mph). Little by little the frozen sand eroded the beach around it, flowing like a river to form the beautiful canyon-like scene Nowicki captured with his camera.

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A 3.5-Minute Music Video Shot in Just 5 Seconds (Using a High Speed Camera)

French filmmaker Guillaume Panariello claims he’s made the “shortest shoot ever” and that might just be true. Using just 5 seconds of actual time, he’s created a 3.5-minute video which packs in a ton zany action – from a fishing eskimo and boozing cupid, to WWII soldiers shooting confetti.

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Check Out What These Three Sisters Did to Liven Up Their Grandmother’s Town

It took the creative minds of three sisters to entirely transform an otherwise common town in Taiwan. Nobody really had a desire to visit the town of Huija, other than to attend one of the three temple gatherings each year. It didn’t help that drab grays and blues on old brick was the popular style there. But that’s different now.

While visiting their grandmother’s house on holiday, the three sisters decided to bring some life to the place. They got some supplies and painted the outside of her house with their favorite cartoon characters including Daruma Dolls, which are a symbol of luck in Japan. What happened next no one in the town could have expected.

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Deep, Dark Forests Sculpted from Cardboard

Sculptor Eva Jospin makes art that completes a circle. She creates dense, dark forests out a material which they ultimately produce – sheets of cardboard. Cutting, layering and gluing the waste product into scenes with surprising depth, one could almost imagine taking a wander amongst their dark trunks, roots and leaves.

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