Data + Design Project

Home Sweet Tome: A House Cut Into A Book

Monday 10.07.2013 , Posted by

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Danish artist Olafur Eliasson reminds us to never judge a book by its cover. Better known for his public installations and sculptural work, Eliasson’s book Your House brings architectural scale to a microscopic level. Out of 454 pristine pages, Eliasson laser-cuts the negative space of his Copenhagen home, each sheet serving as a paper-thin cross section that gives shape to tiny doors, stairways, and window frames. [Read more…]

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A Mobile, Inflatable Concert Hall for Tsunami-Ravaged Japan

Thursday 10.03.2013 , Posted by

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How do you bring joy to the areas of tsunami-ravaged Japan? Bring them music. How do you house such an event? According to British-Indian designer Anish Kapoor, you create an inflatable concert hall unlike any other. The new venue, dubbed Arc Nova will be touring earthquake and tsunami effected areas of Tohoku, spreading joy and giving encouragement in the form of music. [Read more…]

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Temporary Hexa Structures Made from Old Pallets

Monday 09.23.2013 , Posted by

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Michael Lefeber and BC Studies has recently created some impressively fun temporary structures made from completely reused and reusable materials. If you’re a fan of geometric forms, their Hexa Structures are really going to make you feel at home. Each is made from standardized elements, from scaffolding components as the load carrying structure, to discarded wooden pallets as everything from the load bearing floor, to the roof and decorative wall panels. You could easily create a large pile of junk with those materials, but this crew has made something both easily built and attractive. [Read more…]

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Smith Allen Studio Introduces 3D Printed Architecture to the World

Sunday 09.15.2013 , Posted by

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Since 3D printing technology has been introduced, we’ve seen it used for high heel shoes, skateboards, photo booths that make a miniature 3D figurine, and even 3D holograms of unborn babies. The possibilities for this line of machinery seem endless and Smith Allen Studio is taking things to an even larger scale with the world’s first 3D-printed architecture. The Oakland-based duo that comprises Smith Allen Studio is Bryan Allen and Stephanie Smith and their latest structure called Echoviren is made up of 3D-printed bricks. The white bio-plastic structure, which measures 10x10x8 feet, stands proud amidst a forest of Redwood Trees, and will safely decompose in 30-50 years. [Read more…]

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Who Knew Gas Stations Could Be Beautiful? Architectural Marvels from the Mid-Century

Tuesday 09.03.2013 , Posted by

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It’s likely you didn’t even notice the architecture of the gas stations you pulled into this last labor day weekend… but if you did it was probably not because they looked good. Most places you fill up have had their design considered for about 0.2 seconds – before moving on to placing the soft drinks quickly at hand, the dingy toilets hidden somewhere out back and the credit card machine handy. That hasn’t always been the case however, as seen by these beautiful modernist designs from the bygone era – when cars were chrome covered and filling up the tank was the station attendant’s job. [Read more…]

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House on Wheels: Architecture Student Converts Old School Bus Into Modular Living Space

Thursday 08.29.2013 , Posted by

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A house on wheels can be an adventure vehicle, a home with a view, or a moveable apartment unit.  A recent University of Minnesota architecture graduate took on a unique thesis project when he converted an old school bus into a living space. Hank Butitta’s goal was to push the design process beyond theory and beyond drawings. The school bus project was a three-dimensional space, and it came with the corresponding challenges and benefits. The challenge was to take the limited square footage and develop a flexible multi-use space. The benefit: after the project is completed, you have a tiny home on wheels not a PowerPoint presentation. [Read more…]

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Art On The Ground: Postmodern Landscapes By Charles Jencks

Wednesday 08.28.2013 , Posted by

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Charles Jencks’ sinuous sculptures are no ordinary walk in the park. A celebrated postmodern architect, designer, and theorist, Jencks tows the line between design, science, and nature to create dramatic forms that swoop across the the British landscape he calls home. [Read more…]

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Would You Eat a Sandwich in a London Urinal?

Friday 07.26.2013 , Posted by

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As the Brits would say, we’re not “taking the piss” when we say this London sandwich bar/cafe is situated in a Victorian urinal. Called Attendant, the narrow subterranean place is located just south of Regents Park and somewhat hidden below an ornate wrought iron entrance gate. The urinal, which was abandoned for over 50 years, was remodeled by partners Peter Tomlinson and Ben Russell for a respectable $150,000. Besides knocking out one wall, the duo report that the main project was a very thorough cleaning. [Read more…]

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12 Amazing Treehouses Around the Planet

Friday 07.26.2013 , Posted by

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Did you ever have the childhood fantasy of building a great treehouse towering high above? If you did, and actually brought the fantasy into reality, your building may have been limited to just a few pieces of lumber and the house itself only lasted a few seasons. While it was good fun, it never became anything extremely elaborate. Today, for some creative people, their childhood fantasies never left and they have continued to design and build some very impressive homes in the trees. [Read more…]

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Intertwined Scrap Wood Becomes Tree Columns

Thursday 07.25.2013 , Posted by

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Sao Paulo artist Henrique Oliveira makes fierce installation art using scrap wood from the streets of Brazil. At first he would take peeling pieces from the plywood barriers around the city, with weather damage that were falling apart, using them as canvas for paintings, but soon he realized that the flexible nature of the medium could be used to make unimaginable installations. He begins with a plywood skeleton (which he buys) and then uses his salvaged plywood to give texture and color to the structure. For his latest installation in Palais de Tokyo, Paris, Oliveira made it seem as if the columns of the building were growing intertwined tree roots. [Read more…]

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