Every. Single. One. James G. Hancock is Trying to Draw All the Buildings in New York City

There are ambitious projects, and then there are ambitions projects. This definitely counts as a standout example, especially for just one man. Brooklyn-based Australian, James Gulliver Hancock, has set out to catalogue all the buildings in the Big Apple, from famous skyscrapers to ubiquitous brownstones, and he’s doing it by drawing each and every building. If that sounds bonkers, crazy, obsessed – you’d be right – but we love the passion and the result.

Sew Your Own Home: Do Ho Suh Creates Ghostly Buildings Out of Transparent Fabric

For more than a decade Korean artist Do Ho Suh has been sewing homes. Yes, sewing. He employs silk and nylon to create ethereal copies of buildings – including homes he has lived in – carefully constructed to exact measurements of the real-life place. To see one in person is an overwhelming experience, leaving you impressed by scale, color and a superhuman ability to see through buildings.

Federico Babina Illustrates The Famous Sets of Classic Cinema

Federico Babina continues to roll out his architecture inspired interpretations of cinema, this time with a series of set elevations he’s calling ARCHISET. Each examples features a rectangular cutaway of a famous film, often pulling elements from multiple scenes to create one image. They are all entertaining, but like movies themselves, there are a few standouts.

Photos of Bizarre Post-Soviet Era Buildings

Photographer Frank Herfort had one mission when he embarked on a 15,000 mile road-trip tour of post-USSR countries: to capture the most bizarre architecture in the land. After the Soviet Union fell, many cities previously under communist rule began to build grandiose, colorful structures – many with the intention to impress and symbolize a new day. Herfort traveled from Moscow to the Russian/Chinese border on the eastern side and everywhere in between.

Architectural Pattern: Modern Structures Go Beautifully Abstract

Any time you walk through a big city, all it takes is a quick look up to send your mind spinning. Overhead, the walls of skyscrapers climb into the distant sky, showing off their sleek lines, walls of reflective glass and seemingly infinite patterns. Parisian photographer Alexandre Jacques captures this feeling in his series Architectural Pattern. Here he frames his shots to capture only the sides of the building, canting the lens to further confuse our perceptions of reality. His creations take objects that are praised and maligned, revealing a new vision of their beautiful facades.

Abandoned Market Hides A Stained Glass Wonderland

You’ll find a full spectrum of hues in this wondrous market-turned-greenhouse. Located in Toluca, Mexico, this majestic Art Nouveau-style building was originally built in 1910 and housed the city’s first market. When the market closed in 1975, local artist Leopoldo Flores imagined a vibrant, verdant future for the historic site. 

‘Railway Resort’ House for Sale Has Its Own Mini Railroad with Tunnel and Trestle

It’s official, somebody is selling my childhood dream house – and it only costs $3.5 million! This incredible (and incredibly different) estate on 19.67 acres features a passenger carrying miniature railway, complete with tunnels, a towering two-way wooden trestle, and a train storage barn filled with exquisite diesel and steam locomotives. Yes, this is a train hobbyists dream come true – and surprisingly it’s been done with impeccably refined taste.

Abandoned Sixties Lounge is in Need of Some Love

Out in the vibrant city of Lisbon, Portugal remains an architectural gem that is in need of some tender love and care. Originally a thriving hip restaurant, the building is now an abandoned shell – with a surprising amount of style remaining. It provides one of the most spectacular views of the city skyline and of the surrounding landscape.

Back to the Drawing Table: Architectural Pencil & Pen Drawings of Nature

Armed with a drawing table, compass, & protractor, Rafael Araujo draws mathematically complex three dimensional fields with gentle swirls of nature. Butterflies sweep through the networks of perfectly spaced lines and shells spiral out of the precisely calculated fibonacci sequences. While this look is quite simple for a computer to produce with a 3D program, Araujo insists on doing things the old fashioned way with pencil and architectural tools. He calls this series Calculation.

This Small Cabin Looks Like a Stack of Wood

Mobiles Blockhaus-Buero | log house office on wheels

From across a snowy field it just looks like a perfect stack of firewood, but don’t light those logs on fire. It’s actually a small cabin designed by Piet Hein Eek for Dutch pianist and comedian Hans Liberg (the fellow in the pictures). With an exterior made of round wood ends and an interior of wood and plastic on a steel frame, its a uniquely camouflaged building that could easily be overlooked – that is, until its sweeping panoramic windows are opened.