Bizarre and Beautiful Architecture Collages Feature Parts from Many Buildings

Take a series of old world buildings, chop up their best bits, and rearrange them with an eye for the surreal and fantastic. That’s the basic recipe behind German graphic artist Matthias Jung’s bizarre collages of fictional architecture. Sitting in a peaceful, pastoral world, each unusual structure strikes a surprising contrast to the natural beauty that surrounds.

Portraits of Musicians on Old Vinyl Records, by Daniel Edlen

On the very records that hold their music, artist Daniel Edlen creates pitch perfect portraits of famous musicians. Similar to old velvet paintings, he adds the highlights to the dark surface of the vinyl, using only white acrylic paint and a rough-edged brush to dab the likenesses of greats like John Coltrane and Aretha Franklin. Each record is mounted on top of its original cover, with the round paper center peaking through to reveal the name of the artist.

For the First Time Ever, Streaming Music Tops CD Sales

It had to happen sometime. Last year, for the first time ever, income for streaming music from services like Pandora and Spotify was higher than sales for CDs.

That’s according to a report released this month by the Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the major recording companies. To be fair it was a pretty dismal year for music sales in general, but that follows the downward trend we’ve seen for years. With the near unlimited selection, and low (to no) cost for streaming services, it was only a matter of time before CDs had to face the music.

Wooden Wireframe Sculptures Recreate Everyday Objects

Most household items wouldn’t be considered beautiful, but when Polish artist Janusz Grünspek creates sculptures featuring many of them, they become something bigger than their everyday roots. His real-life wireframes take the form of cassette tapes, a coffee maker or an Apple laptop, all made with delicate precision with just wooden skewers and a hot glue gun. Wood isn’t something you usually associate with 3D modeling, but in this case it does the job wonderfully. His series is called “Drawings in Space” (Zeichnungen im Raum).

NBA Study: Refs are Wrong 14% of the Time in Last 2 Minutes of Game

Starting March 1st, the National Basketball Association began releasing reports evaluating all calls and important non-calls which occur in the last two minutes of games. What did they find? In those final important moments, referees have made the wrong call or non-call in more than 14% of cases.

In 288 plays that the NBA considered, 7 whistled calls were wrong, while 34 no-calls were incorrect. If a win for your team is on the line, this isn’t very comforting news. However, Rod Thorn, the league’s president of basketball operations, said “The vast majority of the calls are right.” Referees made the correct call 96% of the time they blew the whistle.

News from Japan: Robot Dogs Are Getting Funerals

Aibo was a robotic dog developed by Sony a while back. Launched in 1999 and discontinued in 2006, about 150,000 dogs were sold in total. The toy was much beloved by owners, thanks to a built-in microphone and camera that helped each dog develop a unique personality.

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But this emotional attachment has triggered a surprising phenomenon. With a lack of repair technicians available, the little robot dogs are now “dying,” so loving Aibo owners in Japan are having ceremonies to honor their passing.

Sean Kenney Builds LEGO Sculptures Inspired by the Natural World

Sean Kenney has been using LEGOs for over a decade to make contemporary sculpture, and in the process he’s worked with millions of the tiny plastic bricks. His most recent work is featuring in his traveling exhibition Nature Connects, which includes 27 sculptures inspired by the web of life – from a small squirrel running along a fence, to a near-life sized bison that used 45,143 LEGO pieces and took 700 hours to complete.

Rain Activated Street Art Brings Smiles to The People of Seattle

You can be mad that it’s raining or you can dance in the rain! The people of Seattle have grown accustomed to a lot of rain, but rather than letting it bring them down, they have a new reason to embrace the rain. Rainworks are street art stencils made by Peregrine Church that only show up when it rains. They feature positive messages and even a rainy day hopscotch game. With the sole purpose of making people smile on rainy days, Church is accomplishing his mission and creating new works often.

This New Printing Process Lets Blind People “See” Art Masterpieces

In Spain’s Museo Del Prado, new technology lets blind people—and everyone—touch art masterpieces. Think of it as braille for paintings. They aren’t the original paintings themselves, of course, but rather detailed high-resolution replicas. Thanks to a new 3D-printing process called Didú, which creates physical objects the way a 3D printer would but applies particular chemicals that allow for more sensory detail when touched, viewers can experience the paintings in a new way.

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Developed by printing studio Estudios Durero, the process begins with a super high-resolution of the painting itself. According to the studio’s homepage:

Cute Little Pathogens: Colorful Microbe Embroidery By Alicia Watkins

Many artists have been inspired by the remarkable shapes of the microscopic world. Glass blower Luke Jerram sculpted beautiful maladies out of glass and now Alicia Watkins combines crafting with science with her colorful embroidery. Germs have never looked so cute as they do in these colorful cross-stitched patterns.