Creepy Couture: A 3D Printed “Spider” Dress That Senses and Reacts to Motion

3D printing is being explored in many different ways, and Dutch artist Anouk Wipprecht isn’t afraid to use the technology to push the limits of fashion. Her latest creation is the “spider” dress, which is outfitted with six customized legs that spring out when it senses motion nearby.

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How Much Does It Cost to Live In Each of the World’s Countries?

How much does it cost to live in Sweden? How about Morocco or Japan? You can’t just compare exchange rates to figure that out. You need people on the ground reporting on how much they pay for a loaf of bread, an apartment or a glass of beer in Stockholm, Fez and Tokyo. That’s what Numbeo has been doing for years, creating a cost of living database with a lot of help from people all around the world. Movehub recently took that information and created a fantastic series of maps comparing how expensive it is to live in all the world’s countries. How does yours measure up?

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Crazy Cat Lovers: An Inside Peek At The Homes Where Cats Outnumber People

For true cat lovers, one cat is never enough. And for French Canadian photographer Andréanne Lupien, neither are a few. In her Crazy Cat Lovers series, she takes a photo of a cat afficionado in his or her home, then digitally multiplies the cats in the most hilariously ridiculous ways. Cats take over the entire shot and the people appear to love their cat covered lives.

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Get Polygonized With This Awesome New Twitter Bot

Turn oridnary pictures into abstract works of art by simply tweeting them to Mario Klingemann’s Lowpoly Bot. Klingemann, who also goes by the name Quasimondo is a coder and artist based in Munich. The bot converts normal images into geometric images via hashtag commands like #subdivision, #shuffle, or #triangle. Or if you’re brave, you can let the bot do it’s thing without any direction. Some people even resubmit lowpoly images that the bot has given them to get something different.

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Learn The Incredible Physics Behind Falling Dominos

In this video, Stephen Morris gives a fantastic demonstration of how dominos work. He uses a collection of dominos made from steel, with each one 1.5x larger than the one toppling before it. Pushing over the minuscule first domino (just 5mm high and 1mm thick) starts a chain reaction that looks nearly impossible – especially when it knocks over the last domino that weighs over 100lbs.

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The Sparkle Palace Cocktail Table: A Rainbow Colored Glass Table That Puts All Other Tables To Shame

Art isn’t just for the walls and shelves, when you find clever pieces of furniture like this one. A beautiful work of art by Minneapolis-based designer, John Foster, this sculpture also doubles as a cocktail table. With colorful geometric prisms reflecting light all over the room, the “Sparkle Palace Cocktail Table” is sure to impress you and your guests. And with a price tag of just $12,000 on Fancy you can get one in every room!

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Mexican Restaurant with 10,000 Animal Bones for Decor

If bones are your thing, then you need to get down to Guadalajara and check out ‘Hueso’, the classy new restaurant that features over 10,000 different bones adorning its walls. Hueso (which translates to Bone in Spanish) is the brain child of Mexican architect Ignacio Cadena.

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Stunning Geometric Textures Carved Into Plywood Using a CNC Machine

Using the precise cutting head of a CNC machine, artist Michael Anderson carves incredibly beautiful geometric patterns and textures into pieces of plywood. Each pass of the machine reveals the layers of Anderson’s source material, adding contour lines that emphasize the ups and downs of each design.

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“Back to the Future II” Was Supposed to Happen in 2015. How Close Did It Get Today?

Two major milestones have been reached in 2015. This year marks the 30th anniversary of Back to the Future, and the year Marty McFly traveled to in the sequel, Back to the Future II. This has a lot of people asking one thing: “just how accurate did the second film get our current year?”

As with most future predictions, it’s a mixed bag. We’ve more than surpassed communication technology with smart phones (and thank goodness they’re not awkwardly strapped to our wrists)… but where’s my hoverboard??

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To Infinity And Beyond: Cosmic Loop Follows An Astronaut Through The Fractals of Space

From the creative minds of The Imaginary Foundation, a think tank in Switzerland, comes this fractal loop that could keep you busy all day long! Follow an astronaut through the cosmos on this digitally detailed loop that keeps going and revealing more colorful pieces each time you watch. The images here are taken from the loop, but to get the full effect, you must see for yourself on Cosmic-Symbolism.com.

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