This Couple Spent 20 Years Building an Incredible Floating Island Home

If you’re going to get away from it all, this is one great way to do it. In 1992, Wayne Adams and Catherine King began building a floating home about half an hour by boat off the coast of tiny Tofino, British Columbia. Today that home has expanded to encompass 12 large platforms covered by living spaces, green houses, lush gardens and plenty of docks to tie up a kayak. Painted in bright magenta and teal hues, they call their self-built island Freedom Cove.

Flyte Sets The Lightbulb Free With This New Levitating Lightbulb

If you like to decorate your home with conversation pieces, then look no further. Fascinated with hover boards since he was a teenager, Simon Morris began studying magnetic levitation. After 5 years of research and development, he is ready to launch his amazing new design, Flyte. Flyte is a levitating light bulb that is probably the coolest way to light your home or office. Using magnets and induction, the bulb is powered through the air. With sustainable sourced oak, ash, and walnut the base is eco-friendly and has an awesome bonus: you can set your phone on it to charge up when you aren’t using the light! A simple tap of the base turns the bulb on and it not only floats above, but it also spins in circles. How cool is that?

6 Things You Can Do on Earth Day to Make the Planet Better

Happy Earth Day from Visual News! There have been a lot of exciting movements since the inception of Earth Day in 1970. Recycling is being utilized more than ever, dialogues over major environmental issues are being discussed and acted upon, farmer’s markets are ubiquitous, and bans on plastic bags and bottles are just beginning in major cities. There’s plenty to be proud of, but no one can pat each other on the back just yet. There is still much to do both globally and locally. For Earth Day 2015, here are a few simple ways you can help the planet and give back.

Surprising: The US is Only 4 Presidents Old

Viewed from the year 2015, the founding of the United States seems like a distant piece of history, but from the right perspective it wasn’t long ago at all. Take this little tidbit of information: the US is only as old as four President’s lives.

When Barak Obama was born (1961), Herbert Hoover was still alive (1874 – 1964). When Hoover was born, Andrew Johnson was still living (1808 – 1875). When Johnson was born John Adams was still alive (1735 – 1826). And there you have it. With just the overlapping lives of four presidents we reach the Founding Fathers of the United States. Pretty amazing.

Since the First Earth Day, the World Population Has Doubled

It’s the 45th Anniversary of Earth Day, and it’s never been more important. Since the worldwide event first celebrated environmental protection back in 1970, the world population has nearly doubled. That’s a seriously sobering fact, for an obvious reason. Even if we have more knowledge of threats to the earth than we did 45 years ago, and even if we are taking action to treat our home planet kindly, there are literally twice as many people creating an impact every day.

Elevators in One World Trade Center Feature a Virtual Journey Through 500 Years of NYC’s Skyline

Riding the elevator to the top of the new One World Trade Center isn’t like any other ride – and that’s not just because it’s tall. Inside the five special elevators servicing the rooftop observation deck is a time-lapse video simulation that compresses 500 years of New York City’s skyline into the time it takes to reach the 102nd floor. The journey takes less than a minute and travels from swampy, tree covered Manhattan island, to the bustling skyscraper filled Big Apple we know today.

A Kinetic Light Installation Dances on the Ceiling of St. Petersburg’s Leningrad Center

St. Petersburg’s historic Leningrad Center has a new and luminous ceiling for its main theater. Above the audience is a matrix of dancing multi-color LED lightbulbs hanging from nearly invisible cords that whisk them up and down in mesmerizing patterns. One moment the field of lights look like gently flowing waves and the next they form a geometric pyramid – each new form is made with smooth and precisely choreographed transitions.

The only problem here? People might be so captivated by the lights that they miss the show itself.

Art Created with Beach Trash Washed Up at Mexico’s Sian Ka’an Reserve

Even the “untouched” areas of the world aren’t free from the effects of human created pollution. Artist Alejandro Duran makes that point clear through his color sorted collections of beach trash that washes up along the coastline of Mexico’s largest federally-protected reserve, Sian Ka’an. Duran’s site-specific installations highlight the situation with aesthetically beautiful organization – the problem of ocean-borne garbage is transformed into surreal forms which both contrast and merge with the natural environment. He calls his series Washed Up.

Which NBA Teams Share the Ball More Evenly?

The 2015 NBA playoffs kicked off this last weekend (in case you didn’t notice your feeds blowing up about it). The Visual News team’s loyalties lie all over the country—from Los Angeles, to Colorado, to New York—but we all like a good game. But while basketball is all about sharing the glory, it isn’t necessarily about sharing the ball. Our good friend (and talented designer) Shane Keaney created this infographic to give us a look at how well each NBA playoff team shares the ball. Does a more even share distribution influence how well the teams perform? We’ll find out this year. 

Fanciful Nature-Filled Pop-Up Art From Bozka

Polish artist and illustrator Bozena Rydlewska, aka Bozka, creates fanciful scenes inspired by the diverse flora and fauna of the natural world. Long a maker of ornate prints, she is now translating her 2D work into delightfully explorable 3D pop-ups. Although her works pays tribute to the nature illustrators of old, her’s is a world that doesn’t play strictly by the rules.