Here’s Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization

Ever wonder how many meteors have hit Earth? The Meteoritical Society is doing its best to keep track. And Javier de la Torre, co-founder of CartoDB, is helping us see the pure volume of hits (into the tens of thousands). His interactive visualization shows a heatmap of hits all over the world, letting you explore where and when meteorites fell, as well as their size and classification. (Pro tip: See if any have landed near your hometown.)

Millennials Have Officially Taken Over the Workforce

For the first time ever, Millennials make up the largest share of the American workforce, surpassing Generation X. That means that more than one-in-three American workers are between the ages of 18 and 34 in 2015. The news comes according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data.

The Millennials recently eclipsed the Baby Boomer generation (born 1946-1964) as those members of the workforce continue to retire. Now as more millennials join the workforce, their numbers are quickly rising.

It seems millennials will soon be running the world. Now, can they save it?

After a Record High, Single Motherhood is on the Decline

Until 2008, the birthrate for unmarried mothers was mysteriously on the rise. That’s changing now. After a peak of nearly 1.73 million children born to unmarried women in 2008, that number declined to 1.61 million in 2013.

Where are the sharpest declines? According to the Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Services, in the demographics that typically have the highest rates of single motherhood: teenagers; black and Hispanic women; and those without a college degree. Where numbers continue to rise are in women 35 years or older. This trend possibly points to changing norms in family structure – some women are having babies outside of marriage by choice, including many who have partners but choose not to get married.

New Research Shows Fewer Americans Identify as Christian

According to a recent Pew Research survey of 35,000 people age 18 and older, Americans’ religious affiliations are notably shifting. While America is still home to more Christians than any other country, fewer people say they are Christian than they did 7 years ago. The survey also notes changes in ethnic diversity among Christians: 

How Much Did the Department of the Defense Pay the NFL to Salute the Troops?

New government documents obtained by NJ.com reveal what some taxpayers may consider disturbing spending by the Department of Defense. A total of $5.4 million in taxpayer money was paid to the NFL between 2011 and 2014 for various salutes to the troops and other advertising during games. As viewers believed these salutes to be genuine acknowledgments for time served—not paid advertising as a recruiting tool—many are upset that taxpayer money was used to mislead viewers. The Department of Defense paid 14 NFL teams $5.4 million to salute the troops. So, how much did they pay?

A Visualization of Every Drug Hunter S. Thompson Took in a 24-Hour Period

Hunter S. Thompson was a great writer. (Check out our 5 Reasons to Read Hunter S. Thompson to find out why). Unfortunately, he is known more for his excessive drug use and lifestyle. What did that really entail, though? The 1993 biography Hunter: The Strange and Savage Life of Hunter S. Thompson by E. Jean Carroll contains a detailed listing of drugs consumed by Thompson in a 24-hour period that is, well, exhausting: 

How NFL Teams Spend Their Draft Picks

Experts are predicting that quarterbacks will be the top two picks in tonight’s NFL Draft, with Florida State’s Jameis Winston going No. 1 to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the Tennessee Titans taking Oregon’s Marcus Mariota at No. 2.

Draft Day talk is all about priorities and how teams choose to tackle those. Here’s a look at what positions teams have emphasized in the first round from 2000-2014. Of course, this doesn’t take into account trades and existing rosters, but it gives us a good idea of where teams are focused and where they should be focused. We’re looking at you, Jacksonville.

In Honor of the Kentucky Derby: How to Make the Best Mint Juleps

This Saturday marks the 141st running of the “greatest two minutes in sports.” Or, if you’re not into that sports stuff, one of the greatest reasons to drink of the year: The Kentucky Derby.

Besides being one of the premiere events for horseracing, the Kentucky Derby is famous for ridiculous hats, celebrities in seersucker, and its signature drink, the Mint Julep. Want to celebrate this weekend? Learn how to make this Derby mainstay and more twists on the classic Julep below.

Dear Data: Two Women Track Personal Data on Postcards and Ship Them Across the Atlantic

Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec have only met twice in person, but they’re quickly getting to know each other through weekly postcards and a mutual obsession for tracking things. Their endearing year-long project “Dear Data” sees the pair sending postcards from New York to London and back – each with a week’s worth of personal data on the front and instructions for reading that data on the back.

China Now Has 15 Cities With Over 10 Million People

A Megacity is defined as any metropolitan area with more than 10 million inhabitants. As the world population continues to urbanize, the number of megacities is quickly growing – and nowhere is that more apparent than China. In this country of nearly 1.4 billion people, the OECD estimates there are 15 megacities (more than double the estimate by the UN). These cities rival New York, Paris and even Tokyo for size – but how many of their names do you recognize?