Data Visualization 101: Area Charts

In our Data Visualization 101 series, we cover each chart type to help you sharpen your data visualization skills.

Like the mountains that they resemble, area charts are a representation of change over time. Whether you’re looking to chart net earnings for individual departments month to month or examining the popularity of music genres since the ‘50s, there are few chart types that communicate time-series relationships so well. Let’s see how area charts can work for you.

How Much Does It Cost to Live In Each of the World’s Countries?

How much does it cost to live in Sweden? How about Morocco or Japan? You can’t just compare exchange rates to figure that out. You need people on the ground reporting on how much they pay for a loaf of bread, an apartment or a glass of beer in Stockholm, Fez and Tokyo. That’s what Numbeo has been doing for years, creating a cost of living database with a lot of help from people all around the world. Movehub recently took that information and created a fantastic series of maps comparing how expensive it is to live in all the world’s countries. How does yours measure up?

Learn The Incredible Physics Behind Falling Dominos

In this video, Stephen Morris gives a fantastic demonstration of how dominos work. He uses a collection of dominos made from steel, with each one 1.5x larger than the one toppling before it. Pushing over the minuscule first domino (just 5mm high and 1mm thick) starts a chain reaction that looks nearly impossible – especially when it knocks over the last domino that weighs over 100lbs.

Data Visualization 101: Line Charts

In our Data Visualization 101 series, we cover each chart type to help you sharpen your data visualization skills.

Line charts are one of the oldest forms of data visualization, and it’s not hard to see why. Whether you’re tracking the fluctuation of stock prices or the popularity of different wine varieties, they give you an accurate and quickly understandable assessment of the trend, acceleration, deceleration, and volatility of the data in question.

This One Picture Will Make You Realize How Big The Universe Actually Is

We’ve all heard the universe is a very big place, but this image from Alex Grossman really drives that concept home.

The question: How far has humanity’s influence reached?

The very first thing created by humanity that left our tiny planet wasn’t a satellite or space ship, it was the broadcasts from a world obsession with radio. This image shows how far radio broadcasts will have reached in our galaxy, the Milky Way, by the time that technology is 200 years old. Considering we only started broadcasting in 1880, this map actually represents our reach in 2080.

WikiGalaxy Allows You to Explore Wikipedia Like An Astronaut Navigating Space

Studying computer science in Paris, engineer Owen Cornec is not waiting for the completion of his master’s degree to begin creating the projects he dreams about. In his free time, outside of his curriculum, he has produced several unique interactive data visualizations. In WikiGalaxy, he invites you to explore Wikipedia as a “galaxy of articles and links”, where you can fly through the uncharted territory and land on Wikipedia searches you might have never thought of. It turns research and learning into a game and a data visualization. It’s easy and fun to get lost in the endless possibilities of WikiGalaxy.

Ferguson: The Numbers Behind The Decision Not to Indict

After the controversial grand jury decision not to indict Officer Darren Wilson for the shooting of Michael Brown, the streets once again filled with outraged protesters – an action echoed across the nation from Oakland to New York. Sparked by the shooting in August, the issue of police brutality has been a hot topic, and the recent decision only underscores questions about racial inequality and a systemic bias.

Looking at the numbers behind who made this decision is eye opening

Take a Guided Tour of the Crowded Airspace Above the UK

At this time of year nearly everyone is winging off to see their family, and in the UK that means seriously busy airspace. Welcome to a typical day in the UK, where 6,000 flights, from commercial to military and general aviation, share the skies over the country. Air traffic control company NATS has created a beautiful, near immersive, visualization detailing all that traffic. The complex work they do is impressive.