Data + Design Project

Google’s Project Loon: Balloon-Powered Internet

Tuesday 06.18.2013 , Posted by

google project loon

The internet is quickly transforming the world we live in, bringing us all closer together and helping us to learn about things we would never know without it. But, according to Google, for 2 out of every 3 people on earth, a fast, affordable internet connection is still unavailable. Keeping the “affordable” part of that equation in mind, and considering all the rugged terrain around the world, running cables and placing antennas simply isn’t going to solve the problem. Enter Project Loon: the latest moonshot from Google[x] that envisions using high-altitude balloons to provide internet at 3G or faster speeds to remote and under supplied areas around the world. [Read more...]

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Otherworldly Sound Absorbent Research Facility

Monday 06.17.2013 , Posted by

1 Microwave Anechoic Chamber

Scientists are always creating unique controlled environments to test products and hypotheses, but sometimes creating these conditions becomes just as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional. English photographer Alastair Philip Wiper gives us an inside look at such facilities, finding their “unintentional beauty”. In an exhibit called Solar/Anechoic, Wiper artistically photographs the world’s largest solar furnace and the anechoic chambers at the Technical University of Denmark. Show here is a selection of photos from the echo-free chambers used to take transmission measurements between microwave antennas and measure how much noise different audio devices make. From some angles the carbon filled foam spikes, look like freshly sharpened blue pencils- until you see them in scale and realize how massive they are. [Read more...]

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ARKYD: The First Publicly Accessible Space Telescope!

Thursday 06.13.2013 , Posted by

Arkyd publically accessable space telescope 2

If you’re like those of us at Visual News, you find yourself looking at the sky most nights (or you might even have glow-in-the-dark stars on your ceiling)… so when it comes to this amazing Kickstarter project, we’re floored. ARKYD [ahrk-kid] is slated to be the first publicly accessible space telescope controlled by you. Through pledges and community involvement the project founder Planetary Resources is planning to put the equivalent of tens of millions of dollars into the hands of students, scientists and a new generation of explorers. Think about it, ideas we haven’t even conceived of can now be tested at anywhere from free to cheap prices, opening up a world of possibilities previously unreachable by the vast intellect of society. [Read more...]

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Incredible 3D Printed Photography

Thursday 05.23.2013 , Posted by

1 3D Printed Photographs

The team at Instructables has a printer that transforms black and white prints into unique three-dimensional worlds. The Objet Connex500 3d printer uses a rigid, semitransparent white material that don’t look like much when seen from the side, but when lit from behind the images gain texture and dimensionality. I don’t know much about any of this, but I do know awesome looking pictures when I see them. [Read more...]

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Harvard Scientist Grows Microscopic Flowers

Thursday 05.23.2013 , Posted by

Microscopic crystal flowers Wim I Noorduin 2

Inside a tiny beaker of water Harvard scientist Wim L. Noorduin has managed to coax chemicals into beautiful and delicate microscopic flowers. On a micron scale he and his colleagues have produced arrangements of crystals that resemble natural forms from roses to broad leaves… and the kicker? They self-assembled! That’s right, these aren’t just pretty pictures from an electron microscope, but a new look at how structures form chemically in nature. [Read more...]

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Welcome to the Future: Projection Mapped Sculptures

Monday 05.20.2013 , Posted by

Sober Industries Projection Mapping Sculptures 4

Like digital creatures set loose from the world of the movie Tron, two wild animals light up the night with dazzling displays of color illuminating their surfaces. Flashes of bold color flicker across their faceted shapes, sharply outlining their edges or quickly breaking into flowing organic forms like leaves in the forest. It’s not your everyday sight in Rotterdam, but these aren’t your average animals either. [Read more...]

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Heartbreaking First World Problems from Twitter

Thursday 05.09.2013 , Posted by

First World Problem Tweets 4

“The barista put 3 pumps of caramel in my macchiato today. I clearly said 2!” Life is tough for “first-worlders” sometimes, so what’s the best way to vent these struggles? Twitter of course! What better way to broadcast frustration about “serious problems” than to you 1,500 close friends around the web. This hilarious collection of tweets pokes fun at this all too common trend, juxtaposing stock images of despondent first world people dwelling on the sad trivialities of their lives. [Read more...]

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Want a 3D Hologram of Your Unborn Baby?

Thursday 05.09.2013 , Posted by

Pioneer hologram printing ultrasound 2

In one of the stranger uses of a new technology, Pioneer is offering a 3D hologram printing service to transform ultrasound data into a one-of-a-kind image of your unborn child. Now you can see a 3D image of what your child looks like, even before they’ve popped out into the world! Yes it’s highly unusual, but judging by the high number of ultrasound photos floating around Facebook, this is going to be a hit. [Read more...]

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Moving Atoms: Making The World’s Smallest Movie

Wednesday 05.01.2013 , Posted by

1 IBM ATOM FILM

Grab some popcorn, because you are about to see the World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film (Guinness World Records approved)! Created by IBM researchers, the movie stars 5,000 carbon monoxide atoms magnified over 100 million times on a scanning tunneling microscope. The team moved actual atoms frame by frame to tell the story of a boy named Adam and his atom! To keep the atoms still, the conditions were -260 degrees centigrade. Moving atoms, not only makes a fascinating little movie, but the implications for atomic memory in computers that will come from this research will allow devices to get even smaller. [Read more...]

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Mechanical Buddhas Bring Motion into Harmony

Wednesday 05.01.2013 , Posted by

mechanical buddha 2

In the land of South Korea resides an artist by the name of Wang Zi Won – a man who is busy constructing mechanical figures of the Buddha. Interested in the relationship between man, science and technology, Wang hopes that the future holds a positive harmony between humans and technology… something he tries to bring forth in his Buddhas. [Read more...]

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