School Cafeteria Lunches Around the World

Each day in the United States, over 32 million students eat lunches from their school cafeterias. The food consumed accounts for more than half of each students daily calorie intake – which therefore makes the school cafeteria that much more important in delivering healthy food and preventing child obesity. Unfortunately, if you grew up going to an American school and eating food in the cafeteria, it is unlikely you got the most delicious and healthy food. Yet, if you grew up going to a school in another country around the world, you may have had a different experience.

WWII Posters Declared War on STDs

Gigantic letters falling from the sky or giant dinosaurs stomping through the jungle might not be the first imagery that comes to mind when thinking of sexually transmitted diseases, but in World War II these posters were the military’s first line of defense against a venereal disease (VD) epidemic. Learning from the lessons of World War I, where many soldiers contracted and died from STDs, the US government started a graphic design war that saw military barracks plastered with posters warning of the dangers of unsafe promiscuity with “loose women.”

A 1950s Kitchen, Locked Away Since It Was Built

Like walking back in time, furniture designer Nathan Chandler opened the door on a home he bought in 2010 and found the kitchen in nearly original condition from when it was built in 1956. For some reason the original owners built the house but never lived in it, keeping it sealed away and rarely using the pastel pink General Electric appliances that were installed from the start.

Frozen Sand Sculpted by Strong Winds on Lake Michigan

Last week, photographer Joshua Nowicki was visiting St. Joseph on the shores of Lake Michigan when he spotted something very odd. Spread out on the beach were hundreds of small towers of sand, each about a foot tall. The tiny formations were created by a combination of freezing temperatures and very high winds (sometimes gusting to around 50 mph). Little by little the frozen sand eroded the beach around it, flowing like a river to form the beautiful canyon-like scene Nowicki captured with his camera.

A Former Monk is Building this Giant Cathedral from Junk. He’s Been Working 52 Years.

In 1963 Justo Gallego Martinez began construction on the foundation for a grand cathedral in Mejorada del Campo, just outside of Madrid. Though he started with no architecture or construction training, the former monk has spent almost every day building his dream. Now 52 years later, his building towers 131 feet into the sky, far above the apartment buildings that surround it.

Polarized Approval: Republican & Democrat Opinion of Every President Since Eisenhower

For Presidents Day, Pew Research Center produced an eye opening visualization of presidential approval over the past 62 years, ranging from the beginning of the Eisenhower administration to the latest poll for Barack Obama. Unlike most presidential approval charts, however, this one splits ratings by political party. Overall, 47% of Americans approve of Obama’s job performance (up from 42% in December), but that score hides a growing polarization between Democrats and Republicans.

A Wild Tour of Dubai, From Top to Bottom

Between its super-tall skyline, vast deserts, artificial palm-shaped islands, and its impressive wealth, Dubai is a place of extremes. It’s no surprise then, that award-winning filmmaker Rob Whitworth needed 3 months to explore, research and film the city and its surrounding lands for his latest video Dubai Flow Motion. It was time well spent.

Shanghai From A Crane Operator’s Perspective

It takes a fearless person to spend their working hours high in the sky, and to build skyscrapers we need these courageous ones. Wei Gensheng works as a crane operator and he has decided to share what Shanghai looks like from his perspective, nearly 2000 feet in the air! From high up in the crane cab, Gensheng shows that his eye for good photographs is just as good as his crane operating skills. This photograph series was taken while Gensheng was working on the construction of the Shanghai Tower.

Capturing Travel Memories With A Camera Was Too Easy, So Teresa Lim Decided to Embroider Them Instead

With cameras that fit in our pockets, stored in a digital form that allows us to have hundreds of thousands at a time, sometimes taking a photo takes us out of the moment in our attempt to preserve it. Teresa Lim has found a way to combat this predicament. Now she spends two hours soaking in the energy of each travel spot while she embroiders what most would snap a quick shot of. In her series called “Sew Wanderlust” she brings us around the world with her and photographs each finished stitch work with the background that inspired it.

16th Century ‘Prayer Nuts’ Hide Miniature Carvings

If you were wealthy and devout in 16th century Europe, one of the ultimate possessions was a prayer nut. These tiny wooden spheres were intricately carved boxes filled with religious scenes like the Crucifixion. Worn around the neck attached to a rosary or on the owners belt, it has been theorized that the outer carvings were inserted with aromatic plants and oils to add to the experience of owning one.