A Recovered Sound Clip Brings Pure Happiness To A Sweet, Old Man In London

We all have digital files stored on our phones that hold an irreplaceable sentimental value. Maybe it’s a photo with a loved one who has passed away, a video of your baby taking his first steps, or a digital love note from the one who makes your heart skip a beat. For 68 year old Stan Beaton, it was a voice mail message recorded by his late wife, Ruby. Ruby passed in 2003 and Stan had kept this memento of the love of his life for over a decade, until it was deleted when Virgin Media did some technical work. Beaton was devastated, but the company found a way to make it up to him. They assigned a team of 10 employees to sift through the digital archives to uncover this sound file.

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Feel-Good Pranks With A Purpose: Prank It Forward

Who doesn’t love a good prank? Break certainly does and they’ve even stepped it up a notch with Prank It Forward. These pranks aren’t only good, they are also for good. Watching this series will make you laugh, make you cry, and most importantly make you want to do good for others. Each uplifting video gives a deserving prank recipient the surprise of a lifetime and the viewer a smile from ear to ear.

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The Nature of War: A Veteran Recalls His Unlikely Friendship with Two Iraqi Boys

In this sad and beautiful cartoon, Oklahoma Army National Guard Specialist Justin Cliburn tells of his deployment in Iraq, where he formed an unlikely friendship with two young boys. He speaks with his wife, Deanne, about the lasting effect of that time and ponders the uncontrollable aspects of war.

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Seeing Red: Richard Mosse’s Unbelievable Photographs Of The Congo

Seas of green become magenta through the lens of Irish documentary photographer Richard Mosse. The 2014 winner of the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize and 2013 Irish representative at the Venice Biennale, Mosse uses vintage infrared film to present a vivid look at the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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This Guy Rode His Unicycle From Canada to Mexico to Fight Human Trafficking

As if the 2,755 mile Great Divide mountain bike trail from Banff, Canada to the Mexican border weren’t difficult enough, Gen Shimizu tackled it on a mountain unicycle! With a mission to raise money for Polaris Project and bring awareness to the modern day slavery that is human trafficking, he spent 88 days on the trail and documented his journal entries each night on his blog. Considering the fact that the profits from human trafficking exceed Google, Nike, and Starbucks combined, Shimizu’s efforts were much needed. From the contributions of people following the trip, Shimizu was able to raise $10,000 for Polaris Project.

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Building an Innovative Maker Space in Post-Disaster Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan tore a path of destruction 100 miles wide through the Philippines last November, affecting 14 million people and displacing 5 million. Almost a year later, the people of the Philippines are still recovering from the massive disaster. Many homes were destroyed and while Filipinos have the motivation to rebuild again, they often lack the tools and resources to do so.

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Judging America: Photographer Shows The Stark Contrast Between Prejudice And Reality

Sometimes we think we know things about people we’ve never even met. By the way they are dressed or their ethnicity or a tabloid article, we think we can leap to some conclusions about who they are as people. Judgment is a natural part of being human, but this series will make you think twice before you mistake your prejudices for knowledge. A former U.S. Marine with a passion for photography, Joel Parés shows that looks can be deceiving in this diptic photo series. He took successful people of all races and showed them first as the way people might falsely judge them, followed by a representation of who they are as people, demonstrating how they serve the world.

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Video Reveals Surprising Life Stories From the Homeless

It’s easy to think that homeless people are far different than ourselves – but just a short conversation can quickly reveal how easy it is to lose your footing in society. Forget about drug problems and being mentally disabled, a lot of homeless are just like us.

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The World’s First Humanitarian 3D Printing “Make-A-Thon” is Underway in Israel

Tikkun Olam are two deeply meaningful Hebrew words which literally translate to “repair the world.” It is a core value of Jewish culture, and is manifesting itself in a beautiful and modern way this week in the city of Nazareth, Northern Israel. For a non-stop 72 hours that began yesterday, a 3D printing “Make-A-Thon” similar to Hack-A-Thons is underway; one where 120 of the top designers, engineers and makers from Israel and the world are bringing customized assistance to those with physical disabilities. It is an open-sourced event with hopes to make a huge impact to those who need help the most.

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It’s a Lunatic Bum. It’s a New Age Tom Green. It’s Matthew Silver: The Great Performer

Laughter is contagious. Energy moves through the universe in a ripple affect. When we take ourselves too seriously, we block this powerful flow, but Matthew Silver is trying to break the dam that society has built and remind the world that it’s okay to laugh. It’s okay to look up and interact with people. It’s okay to be the “village idiot” and it’s okay to laugh with strangers. And the more we do, the happier the world will be. Like Tom Green with a positive message, street artist Matthew Silver can bring a smile to the faces of even the most serious New Yorkers. With an element of surprise, he acts as a modern day jester and works just as hard to make people laugh as others do to buy more stuff.

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