Data + Design Project

A Film Shows How La Sagrada Familia Will Look When Completed (as Soon as 2026!)

Wednesday 10.09.2013 , Posted by

We Build Tomorrow Sagrada Familia1

Just when you thought Barcelona’s Sagrada Familia basilica couldn’t get any bigger, another tower goes up. The master work of Antoni Gaudi, the fantastic structure is on a truly classic building schedule. Started in 1882 (just 131 years ago) the structure was only half completed in 2010. That means there’s far more to complete, and even at its current dizzying height, there’s far more upward growth to be seen. With a strong final push, new targets have been set for a final completion in just 13 years – at the end of 2026. [Read more...]

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11 Words with No English Equivalent

Tuesday 10.01.2013 , Posted by

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Have you ever been wandering in the woods, alone, and longed for a word to describe the feeling? Now you have one: waldeinsamkeit. Ok, if you’re an English speaker that might not say a lot to you; but if you’re German it could mean something significant. Ella Frances Sanders recently created an illustrated series of 11 such words, all that have no equivalent in the english language. Now you have a way to describe those pesky wet rings left on the table by your beer, and that beautiful road-like reflection of the moon on the water (well, at least if you’re Italian or Swedish). [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: John Cage

Monday 09.30.2013 , Posted by

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John Cage is one of the most controversial and important figures in the history of music. He made his mission to redefine how we think about musical composition and performance, creativity, and ultimately life. The important conclusion he reached about music in particular was that it could be anything. Any sound we hear in the course of our daily life could be enjoyed and appreciated in and of itself in the same way as we appreciate a Mozart sonata. We just needed to turn up our ears and our brains, to train and stretch them in order to experience the world around us in a different, more active way. [Read more...]

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Heavenly Bodies: Bejeweled Roman Skeletons from Europe

Saturday 09.21.2013 , Posted by

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It’s a case of mistaken identity, but one that has bizarrely left skeletons across Europe adorned with masses of ornate jewels and gold. These macabre skeletons are part of a group taken from Roman catacombs in the seventeenth century and completely decorated with jewels by teams of nuns, mostly from German-speaking lands. Why go to such great lengths for the dead of another country? These dead, known as ‘the catacomb saints,’ were often mistakenly identified as early christian martyrs put to death by the Romans. [Read more...]

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New York Crime Photos – Superimposing Then and Now (Warning: Graphic)

Monday 09.16.2013 , Posted by

Marc Hermann New York Crime Photos Superimposed 7

Alongside all the glitz and glamour, New York has always had a grim and grisly side. Mark Hermann, photographer and historian for the New York Press Photographers Association, has stitched together imagery collected from the New York Daily News archive, showing crime photos from the not-so-distant past, superimposed on the sanitized New York of today. Be warned – his film-noir-esq images are not for the faint of heart. [Read more...]

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Pastoral Paintings Hidden on the Edge of Old Books

Friday 09.06.2013 , Posted by

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Here’s something that will have you bending all the classic books in your house: fore-edge painting, the art of hiding illustrations and paintings on the outer edges of a book. The technique, which is said to date back to as early as the 1650s, was recently brought to the webs attention by Colossal, who shared brilliant examples of the result in GIF form. [Read more...]

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How Creatives Work: Akira Kurosawa

Wednesday 09.04.2013 , Posted by

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Akira Kurosawa is respected as one of the greatest film directors who ever lived, and as a master of the Samurai genre of Japanese cinema. Films such as “Rashomon,” “Seven Samurai,” Ran,” “Throne of Blood,”  “Yojimbo,” and others, revolutionized cinema and introduced Japanese film to Western audiences. He always said he didn’t like talking about particular films after he had finished them. He wanted them to do the talking for him. “If what I have said in my film is true,” he explained, “someone will understand.” [Read more...]

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The 20 Best Volkswagen Ads from Their 1960s Campaign

Tuesday 09.03.2013 , Posted by

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When Mad Men’s Donald Draper chats about the 1960 Volkswagen ad with his team, he’s rightfully awed. This introduction of the bizarrely shaped auto to the American market was far from the norm. In those days, most car ads looked something like this or this, and while other companies were producing their largest cars ever – advertising “wide-track” steering and selling it with models sporting tuxedos and cocktail dresses – Volkswagen said we should “think small” and that their car was a “lemon.” [Read more...]

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Working Women in the First World War

Tuesday 09.03.2013 , Posted by

Women in World War 1 1

World War Two’s Rosie the Riveter is an iconic figure of the era. Tough and capable, she is symbolic of women’s role in the conflict and their much needed work while men were off at war. World War One had no such figure, but equally strong women. [Read more...]

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96-year Old Man Writes a Song for his Deceased Wife of 75 Years and Enters It Into a Contest

Tuesday 08.27.2013 , Posted by

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When a 96-year-old man named Fred recently entered a song writing contest, he admitted that he couldn’t sing and had never even played an instrument… but that didn’t stop him from submitting. He simply sent a letter with the song he’d written about his wife of 75 years. Lorraine had passed away just a month before, and Fred couldn’t help but write a fitting tribute to the woman he loved so much. His song is called Oh Sweet Lorraine. [Read more...]

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